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NEXT SESSION V STARTED ON SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 2011 AT 10:00 AM ALL ARE WECOME - PROXIMAS 6 SEMANAS DE CLASES DE GARIFUNA PRINCIPIAN EL SABADO 5 DE NOVIEMBRE DEL 2011 A PARTIR DE LAS 10:00 AM


E-mail:  garifunaheritagefoundation@yahoo.com  gahfuinc@garifunaheritagefoundation.org


Logo designed by Ben Flores                     Session V Started Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011 10:00 am  Nuestra proximas 6 semanas de clases empiezan el Sab. 6 de Noviembre en punto de las 10 am



TUNE IN TO OUR FREE LESSONS ON DEMAND POSTED ON PERIODICALLY

AHORA PUEDE VER LAS CLASES EN LINEA A TRAVEZ DE WWW.YOUTUBE.COM PARA PODER APRENDER GARIFUNA EN SU TIEMPO LIBRE


WATCH GAHFU'S GARIFUNA LANGUAGE & CULTURE ACADEMY VIDEOS  ONLINE AT YOUR LEASURE FROM YOUTUBE GAHFU CHANNEL (CLICK ON THE TV)  This program is brought to you in part by the Alliance for California Traditional Arts and the Garifuna Community of Los Angeles.

Ahora con nuestro canal GAHFU en youtube en donde puede ver nuestras lecciones en Garifuna en su tiempo libre para aprenderlo.  Haga un click en la foto de la television.



Based in Los Angeles, the Garifuna American Heritage Foundation United (GAHFU) is an organization whose use of internet technology is galvanizing the renaissance of its cultural riches.  You can now watch some of GAHFU's language and cultural offerings on their newly launched YouTube channel.  GAHFU's YouTube videos compliment their free weekly language and culture classes.  The lessons are also made available online, making it possible for tens of thousands of worldwide listeners to join the GAHFU's Los Angeles classroom.  A grant from ACTA's Living Cultures Grants Program helps to support GAHFU's language and culture classes.


GARIFUNA LANGUAGE & CULTURE ACADEMY OF LOS ANGELES VOLUNTEER TEACHERS:

INSTRUCTORES DE LA ACADEMIA DE IDIOMA Y CULTURA GARIFUNA DE LOS ANGELES:


Lisa Carlos is our new Director of GAHFU's Garifuna Language & Culture Academy. "Cookie" is the mother of 3 sons. She is the youngest child of Peter & Almira Carlos and she is a graduate from Long Beach State.  Lisa is an educator at LAUSD since 1998 in the Special Ed Department. 1st generation American.  She is also  a member of  LGE.


Ruben Reyes is our Senior Teacher at the Garifuna Language & Culture Academy of Los Angeles.  He teaches the advance reading and spoken Garifuna class.  El maestro Ruben Reyes imparte la clase de Garifuna tanto hablado como escrito a nivel avanzado.


Mingo Alvarez is our Senior Drumming Instructor at the Garifuna Language & Culture Academy of Los Angeles.  He is our Master Drummer for the beginners and advance Garifuna Garifuna class.  El maestro Carlos Domingo Alvarez imparte la clase de tambor Garifuna a nivel de principiante y avanzado.

Dale Aranda is our new proud Arufudahati (teacher) at the Garifuna Language & Culture Academy of Los Angeles.  He teaches the children and the beginners class. El maestro Dale Aranda imparte la clase para todos los niños orgullozos de su cultura y tradicion Garifuna.


Ms Jesse Nuñez, teacher during 2010.  She is from Hopkins Village in Belize and she is a retired school teacher.  She also taught at Gulisi School in Dangriga.  La maestra Jesse Nuñez estuvo impartiendo clases durante el 2010 en la Academia de Idioma y Cultura Garifuna de Los Angeles.


Watch the video documentary of the visit of the creator of Punta Rock, Mr. Pen Cayetano & The Turtle Shell Band, to GAHFU's Garifuna Language & Culture Academy in Los Angeles, CA. 



WELCOME THE GAHFU CHANNEL ON YOUTUBE.COM  Click on the picture to come visit our videos from our Garifuna classes and other GAHFU events, projects and workshops.









The Garifuna language, like the English Language, has grammar and syntax

Published by GAHFU's Board of Director Mr. Clifford J. Palacio

The Garifuna language, like the English Language, has grammar and syntax. Nouns in Garifuna, for example, have gender (4), number (2) and person (3). Verbs have tense and can be conjugated and the nouns can be declined. Like English it (Garifuna) has loanwords borrowed from other languages – French (15%), English (10%) and Spanish (5%).

The following current students of Garifuna in LA can attest to the fact that the Garifuna language is written and has structure: Professor at UC San Diego Dr. Michele Goldwasser, Professor at California State University Dominguez Hills Dr. Furusa, Northridge Professor Jennifer Goett at the Central American Studies, Doctor Cadrin E. Gill, Honorary Consul General of St. Vincent & The Grenadines. HISTORICAL ACCOUNT OF THE EVOLUTION OF WRITING IN GARIFUNA 1666 – Fr. Raymond Breton – compiled a Garifuna Dictionary in Yurumein.

Several of the words remain unaltered after 340 years. Many of them are no longer in current use. The 1666 list of words may be found on Internet - Garinet.com, SieneBight.com, Taino.com and GarifunaInstitute.com has published an online interactive dictionary. 1930's: Marcelina Beata Lambey composed several Garifuna hymns all of which are still in use today. 1940's: T. V. Ramos translated English hymns into Garifuna. Mr. Ramos also wrote words of songs of his own. 1951 – a) 1st Garifuna Dictionary was compiled in Belize by Fr. John Stochl; S. J. assisted by a group of Garifuna students. (Theodore Palacio,Eugene Hernandez, Augustine Flores, Govel Morgan and CliffordJ. Palacio)b) “Mother at Your Feet is Kneeling” was translated into Garifunaby Govel Morgan and Clifford Palacio.c) Douglas M. Taylor wrote an Uraga in Hopkins and produced “The Black Caribs of British Honduras” 1972: Fr. Richard Hadel, S.J. revised Stochl’s Garifuna Dictionary .With the assistance of Roman Zuñiga he produced three volumes in Garifuna.1970’s: The Garifuna Mass was translated from English into Garifuna. *Marcellina Lewis wrote several poems in Garifuna.* Don Justo Flores wrote a dictionary in Garifuna.1977: Holy Mass was celebrated by Fr. Oswald Reyes in the GarifunaLanguage in Los Angeles.1983: The Garifuna Bible was published1993: The People’s Garufuna Dictionary by E. Roy Cayetano was released.2002: Bungiu Wabá by E. Roy Cayetano was also released.2007: WATINA, CD was released with a collection of Garifuna songs whoselyrics are written in Garifuna. 2008: In Dangriga an Irish Priest celebrated Holy Mass in Garifuna at the last Garifuna Settlement Day Celebrations Thanksgiving Mass. He also delivered his homily in Garifuna.

There are many more works that are available. List of Garifuna Books on the Market:1) LERÉRUN BÚNGIU TO LÁNINA ISÉRI DARÁDU (Garifuna Bible). 2)Yurumein Daga Rubadan 3) Conversamos en Garifuna 4) Wani le 5) Hererun Wagüchagu 6) The People’s Garifuna Dictionary 7)Bungiu Wabá 8)LIBÁGARI JESÚS 9) LUBENERI SIELU. The list goes on and on…..



ARCHIVED VIDEOCASTS OF GAHFU'S GARIFUNA LANGUAGE & CULTURE ACADEMY

ARCHIVO DE VIDEOS DE LA CLASE DE APRENDIZAJE DEL GARIFUNA GRATIS

You can learn the Garifuna language at your own pace and get the workstudy materials on this page if you scroll down.  Aprenda el idioma Garifuna y encuentre el material didactico en esta pagina al pie de esta misma.

Parts of the Body Intro class Part 1


Garifuna Class: The Face and the Eye




     www.garifunaheritagefoundation.org 

 
June 6th, 2010
 
To: All New Students, Returning Students, Teachers, Staff & Board of Directors
 
From:   Cheryl L. Noralez, President

            Garifuna American Heritage Foundation United, Inc.

            Garifuna Language & Culture Academy

            Long Beah, CA 90813

            (562) 366-9396


RE: Session III
 
Garifuna American Heritage Foundation United, Inc. the staff, the board of directors and our teachers are proud to announce the start of Session III this Saturday, June 12, 2010 at 10:00am.   Session II came to an end on Saturday, May 29th, 2010.  
 
We would like to congratulate Session II graduating class.  We would also like to invite you to come back to class and continue to pursue your goal of learning Garifuna culture, language, drumming, singing the Garifunaduaü (Garifuna way).
 
This project is being made possible in part by the Alliance for California Traditional Arts and the help of the Garifuna community of Los Angeles and the knowledge and dedication of our teachers like Arufudahatu Jessie Nunez, Arufudahati Ruben Reyes and Mingo Alvarez.  Garifuna Language & Culture Academy is located in The Blazer Learning Center 1517 West 48th Street (corner of Denker Avenue) Los Angeles, CA 90062.
 
The invitation is also extended for all of our friends and students online through www.garifunaheritagefoundation.org GAHFU Academy tab and through www.garitv.com .  Username: garifuna Password: education  Remember it’s free and the lessons are readily updated and posted online on www.rubenreyesonline.com and our website.
 
Your donations are welcome as well by going to the Staff/Donate Tab on GAHFU’s website.  Session III will run from Saturday, June 12 through August 7, 2010.  Darime Samudi binafin – See you Saturday morning.

Seremein;


Cheryl L. Noralez

Congratulations to class from Session II Garifuna Language & Culture Academy: Ms Jessie, Gretta, Lisa, Michele, Isani, Rony, Nichole & Bill

May 24, 2010

 

To: All Students, Teachers, Staff & Board of Directors

 

From: Cheryl L. Noralez, President
            

RE: To the Graduating Class Session II

Garifuna American Heritage Foundation United, Inc. the staff, the board of directors and our teachers are proud to bring another session to a happy ending.  Session II started on Saturday, April 10th and it is coming to an end Saturday, May 29th, 2010 with new and returning students participating.  We would like to congratulate the first graduating class of Session II 2010.  All of the students who participated in these 8 wonderful weeks of learning not only did they learn the Garifuna culture, language, drumming and singing but they were also immersed in the Garifunaduaü (Garifuna way).

We could not have made this project possible if it would have not been for the help of the Garifuna community of Los Angeles and the knowledge and dedication of our teachers like Arufudahatu Jessie Nunez, Arufudahati Ruben Reyes who went on sabbatical to finish the movie in Honduras for one session and Mingo Alvarez.  We want to also acknowledge the unconditional support of our Board of Directors: Arufudahati Clifford Palacio, Surusia Cadrin E. Gill and Surusia Michelle Goldwasser.  Also, our proud GAHFU staff: Ms. Helen Laurie, Nichole Martinez, Francis Estrada, Rony Figueroa and our Miss Garifuna Heritage Miss Arteshia Welch. 

Graduating Class: Amani Flores, Laruni Breceño, Jarren Briceño, Anayla Flores, Isani Figueroa, Nisien Notario, Gretta Lewis, Del Flores, Michelle Goldwasser, Helen Laurie, Nichole Martinez, Abraham Laboriel, William Flores, Ben Flores, Elmar Gudiel and Rony Figueroa, Lisa \"Cookie\" Carlos.

You are also invited to come back to our next Session III from Saturday, June 12 through August 21, 2010.  Seremein;
 

Cheryl L. Noralez

May 24, 2010

 

To: All Students, Teachers, Staff & Board of Directors

 

From: Cheryl L. Noralez, President
            

RE: To the Graduating Class Session II

Garifuna American Heritage Foundation United, Inc. the staff, the board of directors and our teachers are proud to bring another session to a happy ending.  Session II started on Saturday, April 10th and it is coming to an end Saturday, May 29th, 2010 with new and returning students participating.  We would like to congratulate the first graduating class of Session II 2010.  All of the students who participated in these 8 wonderful weeks of learning not only did they learn the Garifuna culture, language, drumming and singing but they were also immersed in the Garifunaduaü (Garifuna way).

We could not have made this project possible if it would have not been for the help of the Garifuna community of Los Angeles and the knowledge and dedication of our teachers like Arufudahatu Jessie Nunez, Arufudahati Ruben Reyes who went on sabbatical to finish the movie in Honduras for one session and Mingo Alvarez.  We want to also acknowledge the unconditional support of our Board of Directors: Arufudahati Clifford Palacio, Surusia Cadrin E. Gill and Surusia Michelle Goldwasser.  Also, our proud GAHFU staff: Ms. Helen Laurie, Nichole Martinez, Francis Estrada, Rony Figueroa and our Miss Garifuna Heritage Miss Arteshia Welch. 

Graduating Class: Amani Flores, Laruni Breceño, Jarren Briceño, Anayla Flores, Isani Figueroa, Nisien Notario, Gretta Lewis, Del Flores, Michelle Goldwasser, Helen Laurie, Nichole Martinez, Abraham Laboriel, William Flores, Ben Flores, Elmar Gudiel and Rony Figueroa, Lisa "Cookie" Carlos.

You are also invited to come back to our next Session III from Saturday, June 12 through August 21, 2010.  Seremein;
 

Cheryl L. Noralez


GAHFU’S GARIFUNA CULTURE & LANGUAGE ACADEMY GOALS


1.     To teach Garifuna language to Garinagu and non-Garinagu children and adults.  This includes the teaching of the basic skills of speaking, reading and writing.

2.     To instill among Garinagu and friends an appreciation and love for our beautiful, expressive language, music, culture, beliefs, traditions, folklore, arts & crafts and our Garifunaduaü.

3.     To promote the significance of the Garifuna culture, history and the development of American society.

4.     To nurture, promote, practice, retrieve and document Garifunaduaü in due time before it is lost.

5.     To encourage and motivate Garifuna parents to nurture and develop a Garifuna consciousness in their children.

6.     To explore the use of Garifuna native skills for the purpose of preserving and disseminating their music, dance, story-telling (uraga), craftwork and cooking.

7.     To establish and develop the Garifuna Culture & Language Academy and its curricula.

8.     To foster involvement and participation in the observance and celebration of six major Garifuna events:

a.     March 14, 1795 Chief Joseph Chatuye’s Memorial. He fought against the British for his people and was killed on this date.

b.     April 12, 1797 Arrival of all Garinagu to Punta Gorda, Roatan in Honduras.

c.     November 19, 1802 Garifuna Settlement Day in Belize

d.     November 19, Garifuna Settlement Day in Nicaragua

e.     November 26, 1802 Garifuna Settlement Day in Guatemala

f.      May 18, 2001 UNESCO proclaimed the Garifuna Language, Music and Dance a Masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity.
 


STANDARIZACION REGIONAL DE LA LENGUA GARIFUNA


EL NUEVO SOL NEWSPAPER - CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY NORTHRIDGE

Lucha por el Bilinguismo y el Mantenimieto de la Cultura por Heidy Caceres y Daisy Pineda "Los Garinagu mantienen su lenguage y cultura gracias a un proyecto de "Garifuna Culture and Language"."


Pictures taken by CSUN's El Nuevo Sol Newspaper during the Garifuna Culture and Language School.  Vea nuestras fotos de la escuela en Los angeles.


Arufudahatu Jessie Nunez    Saturday, May 15,2010.

Demonstratives:

Le (m)  to (f) – this,  lira / ligita – that (m),  tura / tuguta – that (f),

Ha – these,   hara – those,   ya – here,   yara / yagüta – there,

Anihan – Here is he / it.    Anuhan  - Here is she / it.

 

Interrogatives:  

Ka / Katei – What / Who?    Ida? – How?   Atiri? – How many?

Idame? – When?   Hagei? – Where is he / it?  Hagoun? – Where is she?

Hagaña? – Where are they?

 

Abahüdüni:

21  wein-aban, 22 wein-biama, 23 wein-ürüwa, 24 wein-gádürü,

25 wein-seingü, 26 wein-sisi, 27 wein-sedü, 28 wein-widü,

29 wein-nefu, 30 darandi.

Wayanuha



* 05-08-2010 Lesson By Ms. Jessie Nunez:  Follows us online and build your vocabulary .





GAHFU, INC. GARIFUNA LANGUAGE & CULTURE ACADEMY


The Garifuna Language & Culture Academy of Los Angeles is a concept started by GAHFU, Inc. and a project developed in association with Mr. Clifford Palacio, Mr. Ruben Reyes, Mr. Carlos Domingo Alvarez, Mr. Sidney Mejia with the help of The Blazer Learning Center run by Mr. Bennie Davenport.  The school was born in 2005 and it was first held at Maabatuwa Cultural Center of Los Angeles.  Mr. Palacio and Mr. Alvarez had previously taught at another location years before.  After Maabatuwa, GAHFU saw the need to establish a more permanent school where families could attend and learn.  The purpose of this project is to preserve the Garifuna language spoken and written which is the lifeline of the Garinagu as we know it.  Those who are fluent in Garifuna can also improve their vocabulary and learn how to write it following the standarized rules accorded in the last convention by the Garifuna Nation scholars.  GAHFU"s academy started as a school in April 2008 at The Blazer Learning Center 1517 W. 48 St. LA, CA 90062. Classes are offered every Saturday from 10 am to 1 pm. For more information call 323-898-6841.  The online classes is also supported by Martin Bermudez and Labuga.com website.


*This project has been made possible in part by a grant from the Alliance for California Traditional Arts, in partnership with the Walter and Elise Haas Fund, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and the James Irvine Foundation.


  


Session I from Jan. 22 thru Mar. 12. Session II Starts Apr 2. thru May 28. Session III Starts Jun. 18 thru Aug. 13.  Session IV Starts Sep. 10 thru Oct. 29.  Session V Starts Nov. 5 thru Dec. 17, 2011!  We have added a Children's Class, a Beginner's Class and an Advanced Class.  All of these classes will be offered in the morning at 10 am including the Drumming  Class.


SAT. MAY 1, 2010 ARUFUDAHATU JESSIE NUNEZ

Arufudahatu Jessie Nunez  Lesson for Sat. May 1, 2010

Lubuña Dimurei

Fa – Ff

Fanidira   flag                                     fañei  comb

Farusu  umbrella                               fáluma  coconut

Fein  bread                                        furumasu  cheese

Feru  iron  / pair                              fiádürü  dollar

Figaga  turkey                                 fígiedu  fork

Funedera  window                        fruridu  fried

Wayanuya:

Vocabulary:  dará  open,   daru  closea,  ruba  (you) give, rub nun. Give me.

Leiga namulen fein lau beru luma eifi.

Busientina furidu figaga lau ereba.

Dara bei funedera lira.

Anihein furumasu lidan ásiedu.

Mégeitina aban farusu.

Anihan aban disi fiádürü.

Beiga eifi lau fígiedu.

Anihein éigini ya.

Daru bei bena, Rony.

Abahüdüni

11 unsu,  12 dusu,  13 taréisi,  14 katorsu,  15 keinsi,  16 disi sisi,

17 disi sedü,  18 disi widü,  19 disi nefu,  20 wein.




SAT. APRIL 24, 2010 ARUFUDAHATU JESSIE NUNEZ

Gayumati  Ee                                           Draw a picture where possible.

egei  shoulder                                 erebei  forehead

 

egi  grater                                       éigini  food

 

eyeri  male                                     éheraha  laugh

 

ereba  cassava bread                     eiga  eat

 

erei  strength                                 eifi  beans

 

 

Vocabulary;

Busientina  I want.     Mégeitina  I need.  Luma /tuma  and or lau with

Translate;

Mégeitina éigini luma duna.

Busientina disi ereba haruga.

Mégeitina erei.

Anuhan aban durugu lau eifi.

Busientina aban eyeri irahü.

Anihan aban agare eiga dunuru.

Anihan biama asíedu eigini.

Anihan beibei, awasi, charigi luma chichanbara luagu dábula.

Mégeitina ürüwa chegidi.

Biama yen narigei, aban nerebe, biama nagu.


SAT. APRIL 17, 2010

Da   Dd

Draw a picture for each.

Dabula  table                                       dunuru  bird

 

 

Duna  water                                       durugu  truck

 

 

Durudia  tortilla                                dínugu  dress

 

 
Abahüdüni 

1  aban      2 biama    3 ürüwa    4 gádürü   5 seingü   6 sisi   7 sedü   

8 widü    9 nefu    10 disi 

Practice with some of your vocabulary words and the parts of the body using the numbers. Ex.  Biama yen nuhobu.  I have two hands.  Disi yen lirahüñü nuhobu.  I have ten fingers. Anihan ürüwa bagü.  Here are three rings.  Anihan duna ya.  There’s water here.  Anihan – Here are: seingü asíedu.  five plates gádürü awasi.  four corn disi beibei.  ten grapes sedü charigi. seven grapefruit sisi budéin.  six bottles widü bimena.  eight bananas  


SAT. MARCH 13, 2010

UREMU (SONG)

LUAGU UBOUHU BALLICEAUX
(ON THE ISALAND OF BELICEAUX) 

Luagu ubouhu Balliceaux, Ñei wañura,

Ñei wayahuaha ladüga súfuri. (2x)

 

Aba hachagaruniwa Ingüleisi luagu Balliceaux

Lun hagumuchaguágüdüniwa.

Ida lubagi wadünrüni wagarawoun lidan fulasu lira?

 

Dimurei le lídangien wayuma, luma saminaü le tídangien wanigi,

Gadünama la ligibugien bagu wawagurügü.



SAT. MARCH 6, 2010

Buiti binafin, anihan arufudahóuni lubá uguñe Samudi 6 lidan Üruwa-Hati, seremein. Ruben Reyes Lesson 5

In this lesson you will learn…

 About things you need, want

Mégeitina, Busientina, and things you have Gámatina

To express concept of the a, some Aban, fiú



 

Mégeitina                                                                        I need

Mégeitina aban weru                                                                                          I need a glass

Mégeitina seinsu                                                                                                            I need money

Mégeitina aban abürühagülei                                                                        I need a pen

Mégeiti aban feru sabadu                                                                                          He needs a pair of shoes

anihein mégeiti lidan nadimurehan Asibañulu                                    I have a problem when speaking in Spanish.

Daritina mégeiti tuagu yagana gúñaraü (m)                                                      I found a problem with my vehicle yesterday.

Daritina mégeiti tuagu nugune wurinouga (f)                                    I found a problem with my vehicle yesterday.

Mégeitu aban tídangien nisabadun                                                                         I am missing one of my shoes.

Úwati mégeitu tuagu Toti lárigibei tátuni tárani                                    After drinking her medicine Toti did not have any problem.

Mamegeirúnti harü bunidi lun ludin chápurugu                                    The ant does not need a hat to go to the store.

Mégeitu Gulisi aban iseri gudu.                                                                        Gulisi needs a new skirt.

Mamegeirunti Walumugu efeintei lidan wuribu                                    Walumugu did not need weapons in the war.

Busientina                                                                        I want

Busientina aban uniyei                                                                                          I wan a drink

Busientina nachürün                                                                                          I need to have a drink.

Busientina aban  muna                                                                                          I want a house

Busientina fiú aransu                                                                                          I want some oranges

busientina aban bímina                                                                                          I want a banana

busienti Nati aban bigibigiti                                                                        my older brother wants a television set.

Busientu Tina aban feru ban                                                                        Tina wants a pair of socks

Mabusienrúntina nikata                                                                                          I don’t want anything

Mabusienrúntina nudin mágidurugu                                                      I don’t want to go to the market.

Busienti Lolo ludin ariegua dawa                                                                        Lolo wants to go to the watch a movie.

 

Gámatina                                                                        I have

Gámatina biama fein lun Panpán                                                                         I have two bread for Panpán

Gámati Nusi aban ugunei weitu                                                                         Nusi has a big vehicle

Gámatu Seriri biama óunwenbun badaya                                                      Seiri has two huge container

Mámatina nikata                                                                                                            I don’t have anything

Mántina nikata                                                                                                            I don’t have anything or I don’t own anything

Gámatiña aban muna                                                                                          they have a house or they own a house

Mámatina aban badima                                                                                          I don’t have a boat

Gámatü Da bandi garüdia                                                                        Mom has lots of books

 

GAHFU’S GARIFUNA CULTURE & LANGUAGE SCHOOL – Arufudahatu Jessie Nuñez March 6, 2010

Ba   ba Lubuña Dimurei              Garünati  Aa

Draw a picture for each word.

Agu  eyes                                          ababaü

Awasi  corn                                    asíedu  plate
 
Agare  alligator                                arigei  ear 

Badía   watermelon                         bagü   ring (finger)

Biama   two  (2)                               beibei  grape

Bena   door                                        beru  butter

Bímena   banana                                 budéin  bottle

Cha  ch

Chegidi  blouse                                    charigi  grapefruit

Chichanbara  ginger                             chuguladi  chocolate


Ba   ba Lubuña Dimurei    Garünati  Aa

Draw a picture for each word.

Agu  eyes                                          ababaü

Awasi  corn                                    asíedu  plate

Agare  alligator                                arigei  ear 
 
Badía   watermelon                         bagü   ring (finger)

Biama   two  (2)                               beibei  grape

 

 

Bena   door                                        beru  butter

Bímena   banana                                 budéin  bottle
 
Cha  ch

Chegidi  blouse                                    charigi  grapefruit
 
Chichanbara  ginger                             chuguladi  chocolate

SAT. FEB. 27, 2010 - GARIFUNA SPIRITUALITY WORKSHOP

The entire GAHFU School students and staff wtook part in an entire day workshop on Garifuna Spirituality. The workshop included Father Tomas Cacho from Honduras, Buyei Manuela Sabio from Honduras and Mariano Gotay from Guatemala as well as messangers - ounagulei Jack Arzu and Freda Paulino.


ARUFUDAHATU JESSE NUÑEZ CLASS

GAHFU'S GARIFUNA LANGUAGE & CULTURE ACADEMY

SAT. FEB. 20, 2010

ariha – to see.     arihini – vision / see

dari / darime – till / until.       Anuhan – here she is.  She is here.   Anihan – here he is.    He is here.

Translate these into English.

 

1.      Buiti binafin. ___________________________________________________

2.     Gúndatina narihinibu binafin le._____________________________________

3.     Darime rabounweyu. ____________________________________________

4.     Idabiña numada? _______________________________________________

5.     Idatiña buguchun? _________________________________________________

6.     Hagoun Cheryl? _________________________________________________

7.     Anuhan Cheryl  ya. ______________________________________________

8.     Ka liri buguchin? ____________________________________________________

9.     Gúndatina nadunragunibu guñoun le. _________________________________

10.                        Darime Samudi. ________________________________________________

 

 Lubuña Dimurei

Garünati  Aa

Draw a picture for each word.

Agu  eyes                                          ababaü

Awasi  corn                                    asíedu  plate

Agare  alligator                                arigei  ear


Lesson 4 Advanced Class - Arufudahati Ruben Reyes 2/20/10

In this lesson you will learn…

        ·     To ask where people and                            Hagaña…?

and things are located

 

·     To talk abount likes and                                     Hínsietiña…

dislikes (plural)                                             Misientiña…

 

·     United States National Anthem

 Leremuna Meriga

·     Conjugation of verbs to go & to walk        

Lafaragadún adügagülei

 hagaña irahüñü?  (hagaña irahüñü?)                                    Where are the children?

Hagaña nibureigiña?  (Ha-ga-ña ni-bu-rei-gi-ña?                            Where are the boys /girls?

añahein aliha  (a-ña-hein a-li-ha)                                    They are reading.

Hagaña wügüriña?  (Ha-ga-ña wü-gü-ri-ña?)                           where are the men?

Añahein nadagimein  (A-ña-hein na-da-gi-mein)                           They are working.

 Hagaña würiña?  (Ha-ga-ña wü-ri-ña?)                                    where are the women?                 

Añahein ábuogua  (A-ña-hein á-buo-gua)                           They are cooking.

 

Hagoun san budigü?   (Ha-goun san bu-di-gü?)                           where are the stores?

Anuhoun uburugu  (a-no-houn u-bu-ru-gu)                           They are in the City.

 

Hísientiña irahüñü nu  (Hí-sien-ti-ña i-ra-hü-ñü nu)                  I like children.

Mísientiña mesu nu  (Mí-sien-ti-ña me-su nu)                           I don’t like cats.

Hínsietiña gürigia nu (Hín-sien-ti-ña gü-ri-gia nu)                           I like people.

Mísientiña dunuru nu  (Mí-sien-ti-ña du-nu-ru nu)                  I do not like birds        

VOCABULARY:Buiti                                    good

Binafin                                    morning

Guñoun                                    evening

Busuguaü                  salutation

Bugia                                    you

Iri                                    name

Niri                                    my name

Nuguya                                    me

Ariñoun                                    later

Haruga                                    tomorrow

Leindi                                    Monday

Fulesi                                    please

Éfereha                                    to spell

Lámbara                  telephone

Gufurandaü                  understand

Kumú                                    bathroom

Dábula                                    tableHaláü                                    chair

Ínsieni                                    love

Abinaha                  to dance

Aliha                                    to read

Ata                                    to drink

Éibuga                                    to walk

Ayanuha                  to speak

Tuma                                    with her

Nibureiti                  young

Wügüri                                    man

Würi                                    woman

Würiña                                    women

Wügüriña                  men

Ábuogua                  to cook

Nadagimein                  to work

Budigü                                    store

Uburugu                  City

Irahü                                    child

Mesu                                    cat

Gürigia                                    people

Dunuru                                    bird

 

 

 

HOMEWORK:

UREMU         (SONG)

Track  available at: www.RubenReyesOnline.com  to practice at homeLEREMUNA MERIGA      

(United States National Anthem in Garifuna)

 

Lásügüragüdün/translated by:  Ruben Reyes

Los Angeles, California, USA 2009

 

Aú bare! Arihabá, lubá larugan le,

Le san wóuyuahabei, ineweyugu lau pantaü?

Luwaruguman Fanidira, lidangien wuribu,

Lóugien bariyeru, warihei  huragiru tan?

Támirihan fulún, duina huáriñurugu,

Arufudati lau rara lan wafanidiran.

Aú bare! Lerehen san huragili lan Fanidira

Lubien le madamurunti, lageira gañüti.

 

 

 

 

 

VOCABULARY:

Aú!                                    _____________________________________

Baré                                    _____________________________________

Ineweyugu                  _____________________________________

Bariyeru                  _____________________________________

Támirihan                  _____________________________________

Fulún                                    _____________________________________

Madamurunti                  _____________________________________

Gáñüti                                    ____________________________________

Huragili                                    ____________________________________

Ínsieni                                    love

Fedu                                    party

Abinaha                  to dance

Lun                                    to him

Nun                                    to me

Ata                                    to drink

Átagua                                    drinking

Gafe                                    coffee

Ñüdün                                    to go

Éibuga                                    to walk

Néibuga                  I am leaving

Tuma                                    with her

Ayanuha                  to talk

Hagéi?                                    Where is he?

Hagóun                  where is she?

Wadagimanu                  work

Nadagimei                  to work

Ani                                    possession

 

Personal Pronoun                                                      possessive

Nuguya                                    Me                                    /                  nani                                     mine                                                      nun                  for me/to me

Buguya                                    You                                    /                  bani                                    yours                                                      bun                  for you/to you

Ligia                                    He                                    /                  lani                                    his                                                      lun                  for him/to him

Tugia                                    She                                    /                  tani                                    hers                                                      tun                  for her/to her

Wagia                                    We                                    /                  wani                                    ours                                                      woun                  for us/to us

Hugia                                    You (plural)                  /                  hani                                    yours                                                      hun                  for you/to you

Hagia                                    They                                    /                  hani                                    Theirs                                                      houn                  for them/to…

Ílemein                                    fire

Watu                                    fire

ílemein                                    my fire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

QUIZ:                                                                                                                                                                                    03/15/2008Complete the following sentences:

 

1)   Buiti _____________                  good morning.

2)   _________________níribei         My name is: ___________________

3)   Ka_______________                  What’s your name?.Translate the following words or sentences:

1)   Ariha_________________________

2)   Aganba         _______________________

3)   Katei         _______________________

4)   Nererun         _______________________

5)   Ya         _______________________

6)   Niduruntia le____________________

7)   Ka biri?         ________________________

8)   I am fine ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­_______________________

9)   Ayó         _______________________

10)                 Diligati ya!_____________________Complete the following words by using the corresponding marker                 

__éibuga                    I’m leaving

__éibuga                                    He is leaving

__éibuga                                    We are leavingEXERSISE: CONJUGATION OF VERBS TO GO AND TO WALK                 
  Verb Conjugate  
  go
  Simple forms Compound forms
   
  Indicative
   
IDIN     (TO GO)  
  Present
nidin I go
bidin you go
lidin, tidin he/she/it goes
woudin we go
hudin you go
houdin they go
   
  Preterite
ñüdüntina I went
ñüdüntibu you went
ñüdünti, ñüdüntu he/she/it went
ñüdüntiwa we went
ñüdüntü you went
ñüdüntiñu they went
   
  Infinitive
   
   
idin to go
   
  Imperative
   
   
beiba go
keimoun let's go
úndilu go
   
  Participle
   
   
  Present
ñüdüina going
  Past
ñüdünlu gone
   
  Compound forms Simple forms
Past participle  
   
ñüdünlu having gone
   
  Indicative
   
   
  Present continuous
nídiña I am going
bídiña you are going
lídiña, tídiña he/she/it is going
wóudiña we are going
húdiña you are going
hóudiña they are going
   
  Present perfect
ñüdünhadina I have gone
ñüdünhadibu you have gone
ñüdünhali, ñüdünharu he/she/it has gone
ñüdünhadiwa we have gone
ñüdünhadü you have gone
ñüdünhaña they have gone
   
  Future
nídinba/ núdinba I will go
bídinba/ búdinba you will go
lídinba/ lúdinba he/she/it will go
wóudinba we will go
hídinba/ húdinba you will go
hóudinba they will go
   
  Future perfect
ñüdüntina hamuga I will have gone
ñüdüntibu hamuga you will have gone
ñüdünti/ñüdüntu hamuga he/she/it will have gone
ñüdüntiwa hamuga we will have gone
ñüdüntü hamuga you will have gone
ñüdüntiña hamuga they will have gone
   
  Past continuous
núdiña buga I was going
núdiña buga you were going
lídiña/ túdiña buga he/she/it was going
wóudiña buga we were going
húdiña buga you were going
hóudiña buga they were going
   
  Past perfect
ñüdünhadina I had gone
ñüdünhadibu you had gone
ñüdünhali, ñüdünharu he/she/it had gone
ñüdünhadiwa we had gone
ñüdünhadü you had gone
ñüdünhaña they had gone
   
  Future continuous
nídinba/ núdinba I will be going
bídinba/ búdinba you will be going
tídinba/ túdinba he/she/it will be going
wóudinba we will be going
húdinba you will be going
hóudinba they will be going
   
  Present perfect continuous
ñüdüñahanían I have been going
ñüdüñahabían you have been going
ñüdüñahalían/ñüdüñahatian he/she/it has been going
ñüdüñahawaña we have been going
ñüdüñahahian you have been going
ñüdüñahahaña they have been going
   
  Past perfect continuous
ñüdüñahanían I had been going
ñüdüñahabían you had been going
ñüdüñahalían/ñüdüñahatian he/she/it had been going
ñüdüñahawaña we had been going
ñüdüñahahian you had been going
ñüdüñahahaña they had been going
   
  Future perfect continuous
nídiña hamuga I will have been going
bídiña hamuga you will have been going
lídiña/ tídiña hamuga he/she/it will have been going
wóudiña hamuga we will have been going
hóudiña hamuga you will have been going
húdiña hamuga they will have been going
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
ÉIBUGA walk
  Simple forms Compound forms
   
   
  Indicative
   
   
  Present
éibugatina I walk
éibugatibu you walk
éibugati/éibugatu he/she/it walks
éibugatiwa we walk
éibugatü you walk
éibugatiñu they walk
   
  Preterite
éibugatina I walked
éibugatibu you walked
éibugati/éibugatu he/she/it walked
éibugatiwa we walked
éibugatü you walked
éibugatiñu they walked
   
  Infinitive
   
   
éibuga to walk
   
  Imperative
   
   
éibuga walk
wéibuga let's walk
béibuga walk
   
  Participle
   
   
  Present
éibugeina walking
   
  Past
   
éibugatina I walked
éibugatibu you walked
éigugati/tu he/she walked
éibugatiwa we walked
éibugatü you walked
éibugatiñu they walked
   
  Past participle
   
  having walked
   
   
VERBS CONJUGATION  
  Indicative
   
  Present continuous
néibuguña I am walking
béibuguña you are walking
léibuguña/ téibuguña he/she/it is walking
wéibuguña we are walking
héibuguña you are walking
héibuguña they are walking
   
  Present perfect
éibugadina I have walked
éibugadibu you have walked
éibugali/ éibugaru he/she/it has walked
éibugadiwa we have walked
éibugadü you have walked
éibugaña they have walked
   
  Future
néibuguba I will walk
béibuguba you will walk
léibuguba/téibuguba he/she/it will walk
wéibuguba we will walk
héibuguba you will walk
héibuguba they will walk
   
  Future perfect
éibugadina hamuga I will have walked
éibugadibu hamuga you will have walked
éibugali/ru hamuga he/she/it will have walked
éibugadiwa hamuga we will have walked
éibugadü hamuga you will have walked
éibugaña hamuga they will have walked
   
  Past continuous
néibuguñaha I was walking
béibuguñaha you were walking
léibuguñaha/téibuguñaha he/she/it was walking
wéibuguñaha we were walking
héibuguñaha you were walking
héibuguñaha they were walking
   
  Past perfect
éibugañahadina I had walked
éibugañahadibu you had walked
éibugañahali/ru he/she/it had walked
éibugañahadiwa we had walked
éibugañahadü you had walked
éibugañahaña they had walked
   
  Future continuous
éibugeina nuba I will be walking
éibugeina buba you will be walking
éibugeina luba/tuba he/she/it will be walking
éibugeina waba we will be walking
éibugeina huba you will be walking
éibugeina haba they will be walking
   
  Present perfect continuous
éibugeina-ñahadina I have been walking
éibugeina-ñahadibu you have been walking
éibugeina-ñahali/ru he/she/it has been walking
éibugena-ñahadiwa we have been walking
éibugeina-ñahadü you have been walking
éibugeina-ñahaña they have been walking
   
  Past perfect continuous
éibugagiendina I had been walking
éigugagiendibu you had been walking
éibugagienli/ru he/she/it had been walking
éibugagiendiwa we had been walking
éibugagiendü you had been walking
éibugagieña they had been walking
   
  Future perfect continuous
néibuguñahameña I will have been walking
béibuguñahameña you will have been walking
léi/teibuguñahameña he/she/it will have been walking
wéibuguñahameña we will have been walking
héibuguñahameña you will have been walking
héibuguñahameña they will have been walking 
Simple forms Compound forms 
   

 


LESSON 3 FEBRUARY 13, 2010


Arufudahati: Ruben Reyes

SPEAK GARIFUNA IN 8 WEEKS         GAHFU/BLAZER LEARNING CENTER, LOS ANGELESLesson 3

In this lesson you will learn…To ask where something Hagéi…?

Or someone is locatedto talk about likes and Hínsienti nun,

dislikes (singular) Hínsienti bun?,

mísienti nu about gender luma/tuma

Hagei lánbara? (Ha-géi lan-ba-ra)                                                       Where is the telephone?

Hagoun kumú? (Ha-goun kumú)                                       Where is the bathroom?

Hagei dábula? (Ha-géi dá-bu-la)                                        Where is the table?

Hagei halaü? (ha-gei ha-laü)                                               Where is the chair?

Hagei Wilfred? (Ha-gei Wil-fred)                                      Where is Wilfred?

Hagoun Ingrid? (ha-goun In-grid)                                                      Where is Ingrid?

 
EXCERSISE:

Complete the space bellow to form a sentence, apply proper gender to each name.

­­Hagei Alfonso?

Hagoun Andrea?

____________Odessa?

____________George?

____________Martha?

____________Anna?

____________Frank?

Hínsieti fedu bun? (hín-sie-ti fe-du bun)                                        do you like to party?

Ayé, hínsieti fedu nun. (a-yé, hín-sie-ti fe-du nun)                                      yes, I like to party.

Hínsieti abinahani bun? (Hín-sie-ti a-bi-na-ha-ni bun?)                           do you like to dance?

Inó, mínsienti abinahani nun. (I-nó, mín-sien-ti a-bi-na-ha-ni nun)   I don’t like to dance!

Hínsieti alihani bun? (Hín-sien-ti a-li-ha-ni bun?)                                       do you like to read?

Ayé, hínsienti alihani nun. (A-yé, hín-sien-ti a-li-ha-ni nun)                 yes, I like to read.

Gátatibu gafe?  (gá-ta-ti-bu ga-fe)                                                        do you like to drink coffee?

Ino, mátatina gafe (I-no, má-ta-ti-na ga-fe)                                      No, I don’t drink coffee.

Néibuga Las Vegas tuma Olga (néi-bu-ga Las Ve-gas tu-ma Ol-ga)       I’m going to Las Vegas with Olga.

Ayanuha tuma Lola (A-ya-nu-ha tu-ma Lo-la)                                                                   talking with Lola.

éi-bu-ga lu-ma Jorge (éi-bu-ga lu-ma Jor-ge)                                                                      walking with Jorge.

Néibuga tuma Martha (Néi-bu-ga tu-ma Mar-tha)                                        I am going with Martha.

EXCERSISE:

FILL THE BLANK SPACES

Éibugatina ______________Jorge

Adimurehatina___________Lola wurinouga

Houtina éigini semeti__________Jimmy uguñe

ADIMUREHA                           (to speak)

ADIMUREHA TUMA             (to speak with)

ADIMUREHA TUMA TOTI                                     (to speak with Tania)

ADIMUREHATINA                (I spoke)

ADIMUREHATINA TUMA NITU TOTI WURINOUGA   (I spoke with Tania yesterday)

ADIMUREHEINA                                     (Speaking)

ADIMUREHEINA TUMA     (speaking with her)

ADIMUREHEINA TUMA TOTI           (speaking with Toti)

ADIMUREHEINA NIA TUMA TOTI WURINOUGA         (I was speaking with Toto yesterday)

Garifuna Language Class/Arufudahati:  Ruben Reyes, Los Angeles, CA. USA. (323)864-1007, wagia1@yahoo.com

 





LESSON 2 FEBRUARY 6, 2010




In this lesson you will learn…

 

·       basic  daily phrases                            Ayé, Inó, Gufurandatibu?,

Uwati gufurandaná, Ida liña lariengun…? etc.

 

·       courtesy expressions                 Seremein, úwati mégeiti,

Fulesi, Ferudun,etc.

 

·       accentuation rules                     Lilurudun pegi

 

·       reading exercise                         Alihadinaü

                                                               

Ayé!  (A-yé)                                                            Yes!

Ino!   (I-no)                                                 No!

Ayé, fulesi!  (A-yé, fu-le-si)                   Yes, please!

Seremein                                                     Thank you!

Úwati mégeiti!  (Ú-wa-ti mé-gei-ti)                            You’re welcome!

Ferudun!  (Fe-ru-dun)                                       Pardon me!

 

Ariengatibu Garifuna? (A-rien-ga-ti-bu Ga-ri-fu-na)      Do you speak Garifuna?

Murusun . (Mu-ru-sun)                                     Only  a little.

Ida lian______garifunou? (I-da lian ga-ri-fu-nou)  How do you say______in garifuna?

Ida lian léferechun? (I-da lian lé-fe-re-chun)                    How do you spell it?

Ka bilanbanranbei? (ka bi-lan-ba-ran-bei)             What is your telephone number?

Ariengayabei fulesi! (A-rien-ga-ya-bei fu-le-si)    Repeat that please!

Gufurandatibu? (gu-fu-ran-da-ti-bu)                       Do you understand?

Úwati gufurandaná! (Ú-wa-ti gu-fu-ran-da-ná)   I don’t understand!

Barütibu aban abürühagülei?              Did you bring a pencil?

Hagoun gárada?                Where is the paper?

Hagoun bigaradan?         Where is your paper?

Ayé, Barütina aban abürühagülei                  yes, I brought a pencil

Barūtina giñe gárada      I also brought paper.

Seremein luagu bídehan                       thank you for helping.

Úwati mégeiti luagu                    you are welcome

Fulesi gidaba ñeingien               move from there please.

Ka uágu?                              Why?

Ladüga anunte aban mutu.      Because somebody is coming.

Ida lian larienguniwa plate lidan Garifuna?         How do you say plate in Garifuna?

Asiedu líribei plate lidan Garifuna. 

 

Lilurudun Pegi:

Sun dimurei lidan Garifuna barütu aban dügüdaguaü tuwougua, anihein amuri barüti pegi

(amuri fiúwati) ; anihein giñe amuri manügünti pegi (amuri máfiurúnti)  Ámuñeguéinarügü fulasu le ñein lubei liyabin amuri.  Lun mérengun lan lalihóunua lidan iñeñei Garifuna lunti lasubudirúniwa lilurudun apegihóuni Garifunou, Anhein afalarúa lúrudu le, lafurendeiruba abürühóuni luma alihóuni Garifunóu.. Anuhán fararaguaü to luwagutu lóuserun pegi. 

The words in the Garifuna language as in many languages have a stress sound in them. Some words are to be marked (orthographic accent), with an accent mark (pegi) on the syllable where the stress is located, and some are not (prosodic accent).

 

1.    Dimurei biama tafareinha: 

Words with two syllables

 

barütumutu tibeagei amuri luagu furumien lafareinha,

The majority of two-syllables words carry the stress on the first syllable in this case the accent mark is not applicable.

 

KÉIBURI / EXAMPLE:

duna, numa, louba, lidan, lougien, bere, lala, erei, eiga, dübü, nehu, teiga. 



a.   Dan ti le barütani amuri luagu libiaman tafareinha, luni lafidirún aban pegi luagu libiaman lafareinha dimurei.        

When the stress sounds on the second syllable, then it should be marked with the /‘/ pegi symbol.

 

KÉIBURI / EXAMPLE:

Numá, lubá, beré, Lalá, budún, mudún, sará, faníe, tapóu, geléin, Teigá, fulún, Chugú.

 

1.       Dimurei Ürüwa tafareinha:

(Words with three syllables)

 

2.   Dan le üruwañoun lan lun lubaruaguóun, barütumutu tibeagei dimurei amuri luagu libiama tarareinha     míchugunti pegi tuagu ladüga le tugía gíriboun (amuri fiyuwatu)

On three or more syllables word the default stress falls on the second syllable, therefore it does not require an accent mark (pegi).

 

KÉIBURI / EXAMPLE:

abelura, aganba, dimurei, uwenedu, benebu, damuriguaü, faluma, adibiri, huraraü, afanseha, abadiragüléi, ruguma.  

 

3.   Dan ti le barütani amuri lidan amu ubaraü, lafidiruba pegi  (amuri bürüwati)

In cases when the stress falls on the first, third, forth, etc.  then an accent mark is required.

KÉIBURI / EXAMPLE:

féndanu, fígiedu, dúmula, éigagua, róunuti, dínguti, ínchahagülei, yágüri, ímirahagülei, sáwara-wara, géigusi, dábula, dáüguaü.  

 

a.   gayarati líchugúniwa lougien aban pegi tuagu dimurei to gíbetu tafareinha. 

Some long words can carry more than one accent mark (pegi)

 

KÉIBURI / EXAMPLE:

áfarahóuwagülei, ínchuahaní, líchugúniwa. 

 

4.   anihein giñe dan siñá lan lafidirúniwa pegi tuagu dimurei to anügütu “gáguti” /ü/ lidan lubara pegi.       

 there are times that the word qualifies for an accent mark but the /ü/ occupies the space, then the accent mark is omitted.

 

KÉIBURI / EXAMPLE:

 dügü 

Alihadinaü (reading exersice):

The following is a story about Satuyé the Garifuna paramount Chief and his wife Barauda in Saint Vincent and the Greanadines (Yurumein).  Apply your knowledge about the accentuation rules in Garifuna, pronounce every syllable slowly and clear.

“SATUYÉ TABU LOUBAFURUGU”

Labürühan Arufudahati (written by the teacher):  Ruben Reyes

Lóugien biama san irumu guentó, lídan bugaha aban hábien Garinagu le gíribei ubouhu Yurumein, ñeinñein meha aban gürigia hanichiguti, chuti lau ani héreti lidan ageindaguni.  Lídangien ti buga lanarime lasibihadi lun sun katei luma lemenihabu aban lagañeiruni hafíen sun mutu lidan audü lun ti buga habuduhan luagu keisi iseri lichügüdina sun ubouhu ligía.  Aban lariengun Satuyé tun linouna lun lan tadügün murusun katón lun, aban tarieguni ruina tei túhabu tamidan lubaragien tóunabuni.  Danbei le arihatali lan lau le lan lúgubu lau lan linarün lariengei tun, aban tóufudahan lun tudin adügoun katóun lun. Murusunbei dan lárigi weyu meme ligía, aban tiabin tau katóun lun

Laruganyabei weyu aban téheragun leigan wahü lau úduraü suridu luagun dábula, aban tanügün fígiedu luma ában lubure gániesi lun tadagaragüdüni lurugabu.  Aban lariegunu hayaina ligía tuagun, aban tapaleradagun gararaguéina tugía lun tudin adügei tubarasegun.  Aban léigini sun leigin busienguaya ligía lálugun laon éigini, lidanbei ladigirun gusinarugun úwaru sóudieru luagu régigi, ñeguwali watu, haruma gusina.  Aban lámanichun ábuti.

Luagu aban binafin ñuruñu lian ábuti Satuyé luagu aban tonpu, ligía lachülagun Joseph irahü áhurereina pútapania lúhaburugu, dáhiguena ligía aban síki-siki luagu lege. Aban lariengun lun lúguchin lau léibuga lan awadaraha luagu aban meruwa le madisebei lun hageira, ariengagi ligía ti giñe úguchili lun lun lan duwari lan lidan léibugun.  Murusunbei dan lárigi, aban tiyabin úguchuru álagüdaha luagu tisani, aban lóunabun ábuti Satuyé tun luagu aningira lan buga awadaraha.  Aban tagararagun úguchuru tárigoun agülülüheina lau tumagundan, tagülülühaña buga tagülülühaña buga, ibidie me buga tun lau anintén lan buga ábuti tárigi-tárigi.  Lidanbei taganbuni lugudárigi aban magülülühánharu lan, aban tagumeserun aremuha:

“an niduheñu,

ida nuba me san?

Dan le bererehan, maganbúnwatibu,

Lidan ti badimurehan, aü adengüdütibu”.

Aban lararamun hábuti sun Garinagu aganbahei taremuhan loubafurugu.  Lidanbei lagumuchun taremuhan aban lasalaladunú, chúinaloun luagu tiumaru darí lun táhayachun le ásienraguni únguaü le líchugubei igundani.

Arieguatei ariegualoun, ariegualoun arieguatei;  ragütei lúhabu ragüléi tuhabu; duntei lidiñe, dunlei tígiri; aban héherehan.  

 

Buingüdabei málaguati tidan yanu:

Fill in the empty spaces to complete the sentence

1.   Aban tanügün Barauda katóun lun Satuyé aban _________________

2.   Lárigienbei leigin Satuyé wahü lau úduraü suridu aban _____________ gániesi.

3.   Lidanbei anihan lan Satuyé ____________gániesi, adügati gániesi ______________________lun______________.

4.   Rabounweyu lachülagua Joseph hau bandi__________________lárigi lawadarahan.

5.   Gúndantu ___________________lárigibei tarihin gawadarahádi lan tiraü. 

 

Dariboun tila dimurei to aban me babuinchagüdüni málaguati: 
 
find the translation of  into english of the following words:

Éhereha (ehe, ehehe…)__to laugh ________________________

Aparaha (apara-para…)________sd_________________

Katoun_______________________________________

Katóun_______________________________________

Awadaraha___________________________________

Duwari_______________________________________

Siki-siki_______________________________________

Tonpu________________________________________

Lasibihadi_____________________________________

Hanichiguti____________________________________

Régigi________________________________________

Watu_________________________________________

Chúinaloun____________________________________

Chüinaloun____________________________________

Hafíen________________________________________

Hafien________________________________________

Lubure________________________________________

Tapaleradagun_________________________________

Pútapanía_____________________________________

Tagülülühaña__________________________________

Tumagudan____________________________________

Lasalalarunú___________________________________

Téheragun_____________________________________

Adeingüdügütibu_______________________________

Téheragún_____________________________________


LESSON 1 JAN. 30 2010 




















GARIFUNA CULTURE & LANGUAGE SCHOOL COMES ALIVE IN ITS 3RD SESSION FOR 2009

On Saturday, August 22, 2009, GAHFU’s  Garifuna Culture and Language School started its third 8-week session of the year with a vibrant group of students.  One new class was added for those interested in learning Garifuna Dance and the long awaited Drumming Class was brought back by popular demand.  

The Garifuna community of Los Angeles young and old responded in numbers by attending our opening session.  The Garifuna Culture and Language class started at 10:00 am and ended at 12:00 noon followed by the Drumming and Conversational class and the Garifuna Dance classes from 12:00 noon to 2:00 pm.  The Blazer Learning Center is the home of our school.  The Blazer learning center is located at 1517 West 48th Street Los Angeles , CA 90062 (323) 898-6841.  

Thanks to the hard work that the teachers and staff have put into this project, we have bEen able to celebrate one year and three months at the Blazer location.  GAHFU, Inc. would like to thank our Teachers and Founding Fathers Clifford Palacio, Sidney Mejia, Ruben Reyes, Carlos Domingo Alvarez, Melecio Gonzalez.  We also want to thank Mr. Benny Davenport, Carlton Davenport and the staff  from The Blazer Learning Center for making this project possible.  A big thanks goes to Nichole Martinez our Secretary and to   Ms. Helen Laurie, Community Liaison.  In addition, our gratitude goes to our funding source The Alliance for California Traditional Arts.  We couldn’t forget the people who have given their donations through our website www..garifunaheritagefoundation.org

 Arufudahati Ruben Reyes is so dedicated to this noble cause that he has spearheaded the opening of a Garifuna Museum on site.  The Garifuna Museum is planning to have not only Garifuna artifacts but also books, photos and any other valuable objects that can be displayed to the public.  So far, Juan Martinez has taken it upon himself to build a life size Wanaragua dancer dressed with an attire that was tailored in Honduras .  For more information about the Garifuna Museum of Los Angeles and if you are interested in donating or lending a piece that can be displayed, you can contact Mr. Reyes (323) 864-1007; e-mail: garifunaheritagefoundation@yahoo.com.

We would like to share some of the pictures taken during our grand opening of our third session for 2009.  If you are interested in attending classes, please contact GAHFU, Inc. You can also participate in our sessions via internet every Saturday from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm Pacific Standard Time.  Please make a donation!  Your kind contribution will play a vital role in preserving the Garifuna legacy and help us make this project grow and reach out to more people.












GAHFU, INC. GARIFUNA CULTURE & LANGUAGE SCHOOL

The Garifuna Culture and Language School of Los Angeles is a concept started by GAHFU, Inc. and a project developed in association with Mr. Clifford Palacio, Mr. Ruben Reyes, Mr. Carlos Domingo Alvarez, Mr. Sidney Mejia with the help of The Blazer Learning Center run by Mr. Bennie Davenport.  The school was born in 2005 and it was first held at Maabatuwa Cultural Center of Los Angeles.  Mr. Palacio and Mr. Alvarez had previously taught at another location years before.  After Maabatuwa, GAHFU saw the need to establish a more permanent school where families could attend and learn.  The purpose of this project is to preserve the Garifuna language spoken and written which is the lifeline of the Garinagu as we know it.  Those who are fluent in Garifuna can also improve their vocabulary and learn how to write it following the standarized rules accorded in the last convention by the Garifuna Nation scholars.  GAHFU"s school started in April 2008 at The Blazer Learning Center 1517 W. 48 St. LA, CA 90062. Classes are offered every Saturday from 10 am to 1 pm. For more information call 323-898-6841.  

*This project has been made possible in part by a grant from the Alliance for California Traditional Arts, in partnership with the Walter and Elise Haas Fund, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, and the James Irvine Foundtion.


Make a donation today to GAHFU's Garifuna Culture & Language School.  We need your donation in order to continue to buy school supplies, snacks and cover advertising expenses in the community.  Haga su donacion y ayudenos a continuar con este maravilloso proyecto el cual asegura la sobrevivencia de la cultura y el idioma Garifuna.








New Drumming and Conversational Garifuna and Garifuna Dance classes added!  New 8-week-session starts on Sat. August 22nd 2009.

Garifuna Culture & Language School announces that its courses begin every 8 weeks from 10am to 1pm at The Blazer Learning Center 1517 West 48th Street LA (corner of Denker and 48th St.) Call to register 323 898-6841 and to find out when the next course starts! e-mail: garifunaheritagefoundation@yahoo.com

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EXAM #1July 11th, 2009 GARIFUNA LANGUAGE CLASS                                            GAHFU/BLAZER

Instructor:   Ruben Reyes

EXAM #1
1.-   BUSUGUAÜ /GREETING
PLEASE TRANSLATE THE FOLLOWIG SENTENCES:
A)    GOOD MORNING NUSI ________________________________________________
B)    GOOD MORNING TO YOU ALSO GLORIA ___________________________________________
C)    HOW ARE YOU? _________________________________________
D)    I AM FINE THANK YOU, AND YOU? _______________________________________________
E)    MAGADIENTINA GIÑE __________________________________________

2.-      TRANSLATE THE FOLLOWING SENTENCES:
A)    I DON’T LIKE FOOD DURING THE MORNING
B)    I LIKE TO RUN
C)    I DON’T LIKE TO RUN
D)    WHERE IS YOUR PAPER
E)    THE PAPER IS ON THE TABLE

3.-   TRANSLATE THE FOLLOWING WORDS:
A)    ÉIGINI________________________
B)    CHAIR________________________
C)    BATHROOM___________________
D)    TELEPHONE____________________
E)    NÉIBUGA______________________
F)    HAGÉI?  ________________________
G)    WHERE IS SHE?  __________________
H)    ÉIBUGA________________________
I)    SEREMEIN______________________
J)    HALAÜ ________________________
K)    TABLE_________________________
L)    A LITLE ________________________Posted in Education | No Comments »Garifuna Language Class LESSON # 4July 10th, 2009 Lesson 4
In this lesson you will learn…

•    To ask where people and             Hagaña…?
and things are located

•    To talk abount likes and                 Hínsietiña…
dislikes (plural)                    Misientiña…

And more…

hagaña irahüñü?  (hagaña irahüñü?)                Where are the children?
Hagaña nibureigiña?  (Ha-ga-ña ni-bu-rei-gi-ña?             Where are the boys /girls?
añahein aliha  (a-ña-hein a-li-ha)                They are reading.
Hagaña wügüriña?  (Ha-ga-ña wü-gü-ri-ña?)            where are the men?
Añahein nadagimein  (A-ña-hein na-da-gi-mein)            They are working.

Hagaña würiña?  (Ha-ga-ña wü-ri-ña?)                where are the women?
Añahein ábuogua  (A-ña-hein á-buo-gua)            They are cooking.

Hagoun san budigü?   (Ha-goun san bu-di-gü?)            where are the stores?
Anuhoun uburugu  (a-no-houn u-bu-ru-gu)            They are in the City.

Hísientiña irahüñü nu  (Hí-sien-ti-ña i-ra-hü-ñü nu)        I like children.
Mísientiña mesu nu  (Mí-sien-ti-ña me-su nu)            I don’t like cats.
Hínsietiña gürigia nu (Hín-sien-ti-ña gü-ri-gia nu)        I like people.
Mísientiña dunuru nu  (Mí-sien-ti-ña du-nu-ru nu)        I do not like birds

VOCABULARY:
Buiti        good
Binafin        morning
Guñoun        evening
Busuguaü    salutation
Bugia        you
Iri        name
Niri        my name
Nuguya        me
Ariñoun        later
Haruga        tomorrow
Leindi        Monday
Fulesi        please
Éfereha        to spell
Lámbara    telephone
Gufurandaü    understand
Kumú        bathroom
Dábula        table
Haláü        chair
Ínsieni        love
Abinaha    to dance
Aliha        to read
Ata        to drink
Éibuga        to walk
Ayanuha    to speak
Tuma        with her
Nibureiti    young
Wügüri        man
Würi        woman
Würiña        women
Wügüriña    men
Ábuogua    to cook
Nadagimein    to work
Budigü        store
Uburugu    City
Irahü        child
Mesu        cat
Gürigia        people
Dunuru        bird


GARIFUNA ANTHEMJune 27th, 2009 Leremuna Garifuna
(Garifuna Anthem / Himno Garifuna)
“Bugawaguaru Wayuna”
Presented by: / Presentado por :    Ruben Reyes

I
An Bugawaguaru nege wayuna,
An Burariba bagei wabu
An, herunbei biyagumari wabu waruweite,
An, Liyumoun chururuti duna.
Ñeinba bagüra bügüra wabu,
Herunbei biyagumari wabu ,
Waluahéinaña Garinagu wáladi.
II
An, Indurounbei nege wabu,
An, Balisinbei nege wabu,
Nigarawounbei nege wabu Waruweite,
An, Wadimalunbei nege wabu
Merigounbei nege wabu,
Yurumeinbei nege wabu,
Waluahéinaña Garinagu wáladi.

III
An, Yurumein nege buga wageirabei,
Bugarügü hamutiwa harutiña ñeingien,
Yurumein nege buga wageirabei,
Bugarügü hamutiwa harutiña ñeingien,
Ligiagu wayabinbei faya-fayañahadügü Lencho,
Wáluaheinaña Garinagu wáladi.
BIS
An, ligiagu wayabinbei faya-fayañahadügü Lencho
Wáluahéinaña Garinagu waladi.
Wáluahéinaña Garinagu waladi.
Wáluahéinaña Garinagu waladi.


Garifuna Language Class, Sat. June 20, 2009

LESSON #2GAHFU/BLAZER LEARNING CENTER, LOS ANGELES, CA. USA.

Speak Garifuna in 8 weeks!


Garifuna Class/ Ruben Reyes instructor, Los Angeles, CA. USA. (323) 864-1007


Lesson 2

In this lesson you will learn…

•    Basic daily phrases            Ayé, Inó, Gufurandatibu?,
Uwati gufurandaná, Ida liña lariengun…? Etc.

•    Courtesy expressions        Seremein, úwati mégeiti,
Fulesi, Ferudun, Etc.

•    Colors                    Ewegi

Ayé!  (A-yé)                    Yes!
Ino!   (I-no)                    No!
Ayé/ayí, fulesi!  (A-yé/a-yí, fu-le-si)                Yes, please!
Seremein                    Than you!
Úwati mégeiti!  (Ú-wa-ti mé-gei-ti)            You’re welcome!
Ferudun!  (Fe-ru-dun)                Pardon me!

Ariengatibu Garifuna? (A-rien-ga-ti-bu Ga-ri-fu-na)    Do you speak Garifuna?
Murusun . (Mu-ru-sun)                Only a little.
Ida lian______garifunou? (I-da lian ga-ri-fu-nou)    How do you say______in garifuna?
Ida lian léferechun? (I-da lian lé-fe-re-chun)        How do you spell it?
Ka bilanbanranbei? (ka bi-lan-ba-ran-bei)        What is your telephone number?
Ariengayabei fulesi! (A-rien-ga-ya-bei fu-le-si)    Repeat that please!
Gufurandatibu? (gu-fu-ran-da-ti-bu)        Do you understand?
Úwati gufurandaná! (Ú-wa-ti gu-fu-ran-da-ná)    I don’t understand!
Barütibu aban abürühagülei?           Did you bring a pencil?
Hagoun gárada?         Where is the paper?
Hagoun bigaradan?     Where is your paper?
Ayé/ayí, Barütina aban abürühagülei          yes, I brought a pencil
Barūtina giñe gárada     I also brought paper.
Seremein luagu bídehan        thank you for helping.
Úwati mégeiti luagu        you are welcome
Fulesi gidaba ñeingien        move from there please.
Ka uágu?            Why?
Ladüga anunte aban mutu.    Because somebody is coming.
Ida lian larienguniwa plate lidan Garifuna?      How do you say plate in Garifuna?
Asiedu líribei plate lidan Garifuna.

EWEGI    (COLORS)
Wuriti        black        negro
Haruti        white        blanco
Funati        red        rojo
Dínguti        blue        azul
Dumari        yellow        amarillo
Árubana    green        verde
Gafe        brown        café
Guchu        purple        morado
Aransu        orange        naranja

Derivation of colors
In order to express the derivation of a color, the suffix -beleti, -yumati, or in some instances  -fati,  must be applied at the end or the word, as in the following examples:
Funabeleti, funayumati        reddish        rojizo
Wuribeleti, wuriyumati,
Harubeleti, haruyumati, harufati
Díngubeleti, dínguyumati
Dumaribeleti, dumariyumati    yellowish    amarillento
Árubanabeleti, árubanayumati,    greenish    verdecito
Gáfebeleti, gáfeyumati,        brownish    cafecito
Gúchubeleti, gúchuyumati,
Aransubeleti, aransuyumati

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Garifuna Language Class, Saturday, June 27, 2009

LESSON #3GAHFU/BLAZER LEARNING CENTER, LOS ANGELES, CA. USA.

Speak Garifuna in 8 weeks!

Garifuna Class/ Ruben Reyes instructor, Los Angeles, CA. USA. (323) 864-1007

Lesson 3

In this lesson you will learn…

•    To ask where something            Hagéi…?
Or someone is located

•    to talk about likes and        Hinsienti nun,
dislikes (singular)            Hinsienti bun?,
misienti nu

•    about gender                   luma/tuma

Hagei lánbara? (Ha-géi lan-ba-ra)            Where is the telephone?
Hagoun kumú? (Ha-goun kumú)            Where is the bathroom?
Hagei dábula? (Ha-géi dá-bu-la)            Where is the table?
Hagei halaü? (ha-gei ha-laü)            Where is the chair?
Hagei Wilfred? (Ha-gei Wil-fred)            Where is Wilfred?
Hagoun Ingrid? (ha-goun In-grid)            Where is Ingrid?
EXCERSISE:
Complete the space bellow to form a sentence, apply proper gender to each name.
¬¬Hagei                Alfonso?
Hagoun            Andrea?
____________Odessa?
____________George?
____________Martha?
____________Anna?
____________Frank?

Hínsieti fedu bun? (hín-sie-ti fe-du bun)            do you like to party?
Ayé, hínsieti fedu nun. (a-yé, hín-sie-ti fe-du nun)         yes, I like to party.
Hínsieti abinahani bun? (Hín-sie-ti a-bi-na-ha-ni bun?)        do you like to dance?
Inó, mínsienti abinahani nun. (I-nó, mín-sien-ti a-bi-na-ha-ni nun)    I don’t like to dance!
Hínsieti alihani bun? (Hín-sien-ti a-li-ha-ni bun?)            do you like to read?
Ayé, hínsienti alihani nun. (A-yé, hín-sien-ti a-li-ha-ni nun)    yes, I like to read.
Gátatibu gafe?  (gá-ta-ti-bu ga-fe)                do you like to drink coffee?
Ino, mátatina gafe (I-no, má-ta-ti-na ga-fe)            No, I don’t drink coffee.

Néibuga Las Vegas tuma Olga (néi-bu-ga Las Ve-gas tu-ma Ol-ga)    I’m going to Las Vegas with Olga.
Ayanuha tuma Lola (A-ya-nu-ha tu-ma Lo-la)                talking with Lola.
éi-bu-ga lu-ma Jorge (éi-bu-ga lu-ma Jor-ge)                walking with Jorge.
Néibuga tuma Martha (Néi-bu-ga tu-ma Mar-tha)            I am going with Martha.

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E-MAILS FROM OUR LISTENERS ON WWW.LABUGA.COM RADIO:


Today for the first time I attended your Garifuna language class on line.  It was great.  I learned many new expressions and words, e.g. harabaganale.  Thanks for this wonderful service.  I will be attending the future lessons with my children.  Also thanks for making it available on line.

Sharron Wiliams Gelobter

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HOMEWORK:  Listen to the song Isieni and transcribe the song in Garifuna


ISIENI

Isieni abanraü lagu báguira numá - Love is a teardrop of your eyes my dear

Asariaheina nábugua buma - Strolling alone with you to get closer

Isieni, abanraü ubaraü woun biamagubei - Love is a place for both of us

Mabarati amu katei luei isieni - Nothing else will take the place of love

Dan le hinsiengua wamá - When we love each other

Isieni lun yaba dan megeinánibu - Love is to be here when I need you

Lun númagien ban lau sun bisaminan - To be on my side with all thoughts

Arihaneime giñe sun bameiragun - I shall also see your needs

Ferudunbana me gufuranda nabu giñe - You shall forgive me and I shall understand you.


Vocabulary:

Liraüraü = small, Liraü = his son, Ubaraü = place, Woun = to us, Houn = to them, Biamagubei = both of us, Mabarati = no place for it, Amu = other, Luei = other than, Dan = time / when, Dan le = when, Hinsiengua wama = when we love each other, Yana = (I) to be here, Yaba = for you to be here, Yara = over there, Yaraba = for you to be over there, Saminau = thoughts, Arihaneime =I shall see, Ariha tei = She shall see, Amegeira = needs, Ferudunbana = you forgive me, Furudunlana = (him) forgive me, Aban = a, an, one.  Fiyu = few, Le = the, this (male), To = the, this (female), Aban Garifuna = a Garifuna, Aban güriguia = a person, Aban iduhei = a relative, Wügüri / eyeri = man, Gudemei = poverty, Gudemeti = he is poor, Gudemetu = she is poor, Maguali = lazu, Mamagualitina = I'm not lazy, Gundati = he is happy, Magundati = he is not happy, Magundati = he is not happy, Magundatu = She is not happy, Gundatina / tibu / ti / tu / tiwa / tü / tiña, Ufemeni = greed, Ufemetibu = ou are greedy.

Saturday, May 2nd, 2009 GAHFU, Inc. & Ruben Reyes







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July 8, 2008

To Whom It May Concern:

I would like to express my full support for the Garifuna Culture and Language School, I have participated in previous events sponsored by the Garifuna American Heritage Foundation United (GAHFU), most notably the annual forum. I find GAHFU's professionalism and commitment to the Garifuna culture an important factor in my participation in their events. For that reason, I have chosen to be a student in the Garifuna Culture and Language School.

I grew up in St. Vincent, or as we call our homeland, Yurumein. I am Garifuna. In St. Vincent, however, my people were not allowed to speak their language or practice our beliefs. I never learned the language of my ancestors. I have accomplished many things in my life. I have a wonderful family. I am a physician in family practice in Los Angeles. I am also the Honorary Consul General of St. Vincent and the Grenadines in Los Angeles. Learning my ancestral language is something I must now accomplish.

I now live and work in the Garifuna community in Los Angeles. My people come from St. Vincent, Honduras, Guatemala, Nicaragua, and Belize. Los Angeles is now also our home. We come together as a community various times throughout the year. We, though, are in need of a place to come together regularly. And we are desperately in need of a place where our children can grow up feeling a part of the Garifuna community, learning our language, and practicing our traditions. The Garifuna Culture and Language School will provide us a place to come together and continue to be Garifuna. I give the school my full and active support. I hope you will, also.

Sincerily;

Cadrin E. Gill, M.D.



Avis Anigi Briggs
Torrance , CA
July 14, 2008
Cheryl L. Noralez


President & Founder
Garifuna American Heritage Foundation United, Inc.
P.O. Box 10054
Long Beach , CA 90810
(562) 366-9396


Dear Cheryl:


All my life I have lived with a Garifuna, my mother, and have been in awe of her ability to speak the language of our ancestors.   There was a time when she tried to teach me but my school work always took precedence. I am older now and have taken an even greater interest in my culture.
I found it difficult to just read books and make use of online vocabulary tools. I couldn't connect these resources with my real Garifuna life.   I tried to ask my family to teach me, but that too proved difficult, due to the lack of structure in the teaching. It wasn't until I came across the GAHFU, Inc. website advertisement for Garifuna classes that I started believing that learning Garifuna was not completely undo-able as an adult.


Since enrolling into the class, my Garifuna vocabulary has improved tremendously. I have learned so much about Garifuna as a people and our history. All this newly acquired knowledge has instilled in me a strong sense of pride.   I don't believe I would have acquired it without the help of GAHFU organization and the classes they have offered. 


I strongly recommend that GAHFU’s Garifuna Culture and Language school continue to provide these classes for the preservation and dissemination of the Garifuna culture and language.   As you know Garifuna has been declared an endangered language in the process of quickly disappearing.   You have my full support and if you need to contact me please do so by e-mail anigib@yahoo.com .
 
Sincerely,
 
Avis Anigi Briggs

SAMPLE OF THE FINAL EXAMINATION FOR SESSION STARTED ON SAT. MAY 10, 2008




GAHFU GARIFUNA CULTURE AND LANGUAGE SCHOOL

Pamphlet given by Arufudahati Clifford Palacio on Sat. January 24th 2009









LEARN GARIFUNA - LEARN HOW TO SPEAK AND WRITE GARIFUNA

GAHFU, Inc. in collaboration with The Blazers present:


SATURDAY AUGUST 30TH 2008 WILL BE THE OFFICIAL DATE FOR THE NEW SESSION!

Sign up now classes start on Saturday, Nov. 1, 2008 at The Blazers House 1517 West 48th Street corner of Denker (between Normandie and Denker) Los Angeles, CA 90062.  Classes are filling now!  We are also offering a Garifuna Language Through Music class where you can learn the language while playing drums and singing Garifuna songs.  Classes will be offered on Saturdays between 10 am to 1 pm for 8 consecutive Saturdays. Tuition fee is $25 per student. *  Inscribase ya en los cursos de Aprendizaje del Idioma Garifuna en el residencia del Blazers House 1517 West 48th St. esquina de la Denker. Los Angeles, CA 90062.  Cupo limitado.  Tambien puede tomar el curso de Musica y Cultura Garifuna en donde no solamente aprendera el idioma sino tambien como tocar el tambor y cantar melodias en Garifuna.  Las clases seran impartidas de 10 am a 1 pm todos los dias Sabados por 6 semanas consecutivas.  El valor del curso es de $25 en general.


Adults learning Garifuna language.


OVERVIEW:       GARIFUNA LANGUAGE AND CULTURAL SCHOOL

                                  Saturdays from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm

How do I get admitted to Garifuna Language & Cultural School?

Complete a GAHFU School application for admission and return it to GAHFU P.O. Box 10054 Long Beach, CA 90810, e-mail to: garifunaheritagefoundation@yahoo.com or hand it in person at the school location.

Can I attend Garifuna Language & Cultural School?

You may attend Garifuna Language & Cultural School:
You are 6 years of age or older; OR You have the desire to learn the Garifuna Language and Culture and participate and complete in a timely manner the work that is required in class and at home.  If you are under the age of 18, you need your parent’s permission to register.  Parents are responsible for dropping off and picking up their children.  We do not offer daycare services.

Do I need a high school diploma to attend?

You do not need a high school diploma, GED, or high school equivalency certificate to attend the Garifuna Language & Cultural School.

Do I need to be a California resident or a Native Garifuna to attend?

You do not have to be a permanent California resident or a Native Garifuna to attend the Garifuna Language & Cultural School; however, you must be willing to accept and respect the values and traditions observed by Garinagu.

Assessment
How do I know if I will be successful in courses I take?
Make and appointment for assessment by calling Rony Figueroa (323) 898-6841 Cheryl Noralez (323) 875-6372  http://garifunaheritagefoundation.org

Orientation
A short orientation to Garifuna Language & Cultural School will be given the first day of class.  The orientation will include information regarding homework, testing and grading, behavior and rules, expectations and financial obligations/responsibility.  Blazer’s Safe Heaven House 1517 West 48th  Street Los Angeles, CA 90062 (323) 292-2261 (between Normandie and Western Avenues).  

Course and Registration Fee

The required cost of attending the Garifuna Language & Cultural School includes enrollment fees, materials fees and cost for supplies, etc.   The course is $25.00 for adults 18 and above and $25 for students 17 and under.  This fee is good for the entire 6-week-course.  These fees are non-refundable. Students are allowed to miss only one Saturday in order to successfully receive a certificate of completion of the course unless otherwise determined by the instructor and the GAHFU, Inc. administrators.  GAHFU reserves the right to refuse service to anyone.  We will offer a Beginners, Intermediate and advanced course in addition to the Garifuna Music and Culture Course.

Please make your check or money order payable to GAHFU, Inc. or register on line with your VISA, Mastercard, American Express or Debit Card. No cash please!

Garifuna American Heritage Foundation United
"Dedicated To Preserving Our Garifuna Heritage"


SYLLABUS:               Introduction to Garifuna Language 1

                                 
Instructor: Ruben Reyes Phone (323) 864-1007 Blazer  (323) 292-2261
Office: Blazer’s House E-mail Wagia1@yahoo.com
Office Hours: 1 hour after the class ends.  Course offered: Saturdays 10:00 am to 1:00 pm 

Text:Study guide which will include vocabulary, homework and multimedia.Description:Recommended for native and non-native speakers of Garifuna and for students who are interested in learning the basics i.e. the alphabet, vowels, numbers, greetings and vocabulary.

Goals:

To be able to learn the alphabet, vowels and number in Garifuna
To be able to learn the basic writing skills in Garifuna 
To learn the basics about the Garifuna  language like salutations and  vocabulary  Requirements:
To be eager to learn a new language and to be willing to appreciate the Garifuna culture.

Resources:  www.garifunaheritagefoundation.orgEvaluation:

Students enrolled in this course are expected to successfully complete the 6-week-course which will be offered on Saturdays from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm at the Blazer’s House located at 1517 West 48th Street (corner of  Denker) Los Angeles, CA 90062 (323) 292-2261.  Students are  allowed to miss only one Saturday in order to successfully receive a certificate of completion of the course unless otherwise determined by the instructor and the GAHFU, Inc. administrators.  GAHFU reserves the right to refuse service to anyone.

Examinations:

There will be a mid-term administered during week 3 and the final examination will take place the last Saturday of the course and it will be described by the instructor.

Children learning Garifuna through music and culture at GAHFU's school.


  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~  ~ 

OVERVIEW:           GARIFUNA LANGUAGE AND CULTURAL SCHOOL
                                      Garifuna Music and Culture Course

                          Saturdays from 10:00 noon to 1:00 pm 8-Week-Course

How do I get admitted to Garifuna Language & Cultural School?

Complete a GAHFU School application for admission and return it to GAHFU P.O. Box 10054 Long Beach, CA 90810, e-mail to:
garifunaheritagefoundation@yahoo.com or hand it in person at the school location.

Can I attend Garifuna Language & Cultural School?

You may attend Garifuna Language & Cultural School:
You are 6 years of age or older; OR You have the desire to learn the Garifuna Language and Culture and participate and complete in a timely manner the work that is required in class and at home.  If you are under the age of 18, you need your parent’s permission to register.  Parents are responsible for dropping off and picking up their children.  We do not offer daycare services.

Do I need a high school diploma to attend?

You do not need a high school diploma, GED, or high school equivalency certificate to attend the Garifuna Language & Cultural School.

Do I need to be a California resident or a Native Garifuna to attend?

You do not have to be a permanent California resident or a Native Garifuna to attend the Garifuna Language & Cultural School; however, you must be willing to accept and respect the values and traditions observed by Garinagu.

Assessment
How do I know if I will be successful in courses I take?
Make and appointment for assessment by calling Rony Figueroa (323) 898-6841 Cheryl Noralez (562) 366-9396  http://garifunaheritagefoundation.org

Orientation
A short orientation to Garifuna Language & Cultural School will be given the first day of class.  The orientation will include information regarding homework, testing and grading, behavior and rules, expectations and financial obligations/responsibility.  Blazer’s Safe Heaven House 1517 West 48th  Street Los Angeles, CA 90062 (323) 292-2261 (between Normandie and Denker Avenues).   

Course and Registration Fee

The required cost of attending the Garifuna Language & Cultural School includes enrollment fees, materials fees and cost for supplies, etc.  The course is $25.00 for adults 18 and above and $25 for students 17 and under.  This fee is good for the entire 6-week-course.  These fees are non-refundable. Students are allowed to miss only one Saturday in order to successfully receive a certificate of completion of the course unless otherwise determined by the instructor and the GAHFU, Inc. administrators.  GAHFU reserves the right to refuse service to anyone.  We will offer a Beginners, Intermediate and advanced course in addition to the Garifuna Music and Culture Course.

Please make your check or money order payable to GAHFU, Inc. or register on line with your VISA, Mastercard, American Express or Debit Card. No cash please!Garifuna American Heritage Foundation United
"Dedicated To Preserving Our Garifuna Heritage"
                       

SYLLABUS:                         Garifuna Music and Culture

Instructor: TBA                                                         Blazer Learning Center (323) 292-2261
Office Blazer’s House 1517 W. 48th St. LA   E-mail: garifunaheritagefoundation@yahoo.com
Office Hours:                                                                              Saturdays 10 am to 1 pm 

Text: Study guide which will include vocabulary, homework and multimedia.

Description: Recommended for native and non-native Garifuna and for students who are interested in learning the different Garifuna music & dance styles: punta, Charikanari.  Investigate Garifuna characters: Warini, Indio Barbaro and Tira.  Learn to write and sing Garifuna songs and learn to play the different styles of drum.

Goals:

To be able to learn new Garifuna words related to music, dance and characters
To increase the students’ cultural awareness and appreciation of Garifuna  music, dance and characters.
To enhance the ability to bridge the gap between language acquisition and music or songwriting.
To appreciate the contribution of Garifuna drumming, music and dance to World Music. Requirements:

To be eager to study Garifuna music, dance and characters and to be able to gain a greater pool of Garifuna words and a better understanding of the important role of language and music to the culture.Resources:

www.garifunaheritagefoundation.org - Maabatuwa Cultural Center Evaluation:

Students enrolled in this course are expected to successfully complete the 8-week-course which will be offered on Saturdays from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm at Blazer Learning Center 1517 West 48th  Street Los Angeles, CA 90062 (323) 292-2261 (between Normandie and Denker Avenues). 

  Students are  allowed to miss only two Saturdays in order to successfully receive a certificate of completion of the course unless otherwise determined by the instructor and the GAHFU, Inc. administrators.  GAHFU reserves the right to refuse service to anyone.

Examinations:

There will be a final examination will take place the last Saturday of the course and it will be described by the instructor.

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VIVE EL TAINO

Posted by: "UCTP Office" la_voz_taino@yahoo.com   la_voz_taino Thu Mar 20, 2008 1:04 pm (PDT) "Cómo es posible que de los taínos no se acuerde
nadie'".

Por Eugenio Hopgood Dávila / ehopgood@elnuevodia .com

Siglos después de que la historia oficial declarara
extintos a los indígenas de Borikén, centenares de
puertorriqueñ os invocan desde investigaciones
genéticas hasta las revelaciones místicas de sus
caciques y proclaman ser el pueblo taíno vivo entre
nosotros.

Las dos organizaciones taínas más conocidas son el
Consejo General de Taínos Borincanos, que dirige la
artesana y música Elba Anacaona Lugo, conocida entre
su gente como "Anaca"; y el Concilio Taíno Guacu-Matú
a Borikén Inc., que lidera el también artesano y
enfermero graduado Martín Veguilla, mejor conocido
entre los suyos como el "Cacike Cacibaopil", que
significa Piedra Sagrada del Espíritu.

Aunque estos dos líderes taínos son enconados rivales,
con pésimas relaciones entre ellos, ambos tienen en
común la práctica de la espiritualidad taína -con sus
variantes- el afán de identificarse con los
antepasados indígenas y su cultura, como la interpreta
cada cual, y la reivindicació n del derecho -como
pueblo indígena- de participar directamente en el
manejo de sus coabeyes (cementerios) y demás "lugares
sagrados" que el gobierno y los científicos ven como
yacimientos arqueológicos.

"Desde niño mi abuela me decía que venía de indios
taínos... ella decía que venía de una abuela que se
llamaba Gueiyara", cuenta Veguilla, oriundo de los
campos de Cayey. Dice el cacique que su interés en lo
taíno se incrementó cuando fue a estudiar Artes
Plásticas a la Universidad de Puerto Rico en la década
de 1970 y se adentró en la lectura de las crónicas de
Indias.

"Vi que los españoles habían cometido atrocidades
contra los taínos en nombre de Cristo... cuando empecé
a leer todas esas cosas el dolor fue grande y pensé
que cómo es posible que de los taínos no se acuerde
nadie", reflexiona Veguilla con expresión de
desconsuelo mientras se toma un café.

"De ahí fue que vino el interés de yo levantar
entonces un pueblo, más bien culturalmente. O sea,
convertir al puertorriqueñ o en boricua, dice en
alusión al gentilicio de origen taíno".

El encuentro de Anaca con lo taíno también tuvo que
ver con abuelos y con tristezas. Recuerda ella que de
niña en el barrio Tetuán de Utuado le deprimían las
películas de "indios y vaqueros" en las que "siempre
mataban a los indígenas".

"Cuando veía eso me escondía a llorar detrás de la
puerta de mi cuarto, lloraba con tanta angustia..." ,
cuenta Anaca desde la sala de su modesta casa, repleta
de arte y decoraciones indígenas en una loma del
barrio Quebrada Negrito de Trujillo Alto.

"Luego descubrí que teníamos la consanguinidad de los
pueblos indoamericanos. .. que yo tenía esa identidad
adentro y no lo sabía".

Sobre la manera en que han aprendido las prácticas
ceremoniales que fueron abandonadas por siglos, ambos
invocan visiones y revelaciones místicas -además del
estudio histórico y arqueológico- como uno de los
fundamentos de su conocimiento sobre la cultura de los
ancestros.

"Una vez en El Yunque estábamos soplando los caracoles
y escuchamos los mayoguacanes, (tambores taínos),
también escuchamos cantos en lengua taína, los
areytos, hablando, tocando las maracas", relata
Veguilla al explicar cómo conoce los ritmos y música
taínos.

La visión de Anaca, quien afirma tener ocasionales
revelaciones de los ancestros, no sólo fue musical,
sino un llamado hacia el mundo espiritual taíno.

Eran los años 1970 y Elba era una joven cuatrista que
incursionaba en la música jíbara y la nueva trova y
vivía en un campo del sector La Yuca en Ponce con
otros músicos. "Cerré los ojos para descansar cuando
entonces me presentan esa finca gigantesca sembrada
artísticamente y veía como unas matas de plátano, pero
con flores, palmas y yagrumos; entonces había unos
caminos serpenteados y por ahí corrían los taínos y
tenían moñitos, un jacho de tabonuco prendido en fuego
y era de noche y yo lo observaba de arriba... pues
pregunté qué es eso y me dicen: ese es el paseo taíno
desde nuestras raíces más antiguas hasta la
actualidad".

Entonces bautizó a su grupo Paseo Taíno, germen que
evolucionó hasta convertirse en la organización que
hoy dirige y que como la de Veguilla -sólo que cada
cual a su manera- se dedica a promover "valores
taínos" como el amor a la Madre Tierra, y la práctica
de rituales indígenas y recreaciones artísticas y la
defensa del patrimonio indígena.

Fuente: http://www.nacionta ino.blogspot. com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

                                               A Garífuna BEACON

                                        By: Celso Castro (21-Jan-2008)

Brother Andy! You are our beacon to the world
You have brightened our trail of music and culture
You have showed us the way to the objective
Strong and unwavering as you stand tall and bright

You brighten the way for others to work and endure
You have bridged a cultural divide with music and message
From the center of the Americas to the North, South, East and West
Forever strong as we shall all continue your plight

You are a beacon in our long journey
You have kept us together as we sing, dance, reflect and focus
You have set the path for us and we shall follow
The light may be a bit dimmer but your posture was wright

The BEACON stands tall and strong. So long, Brother Andy!
 


The United States Census is coming up in 2010 and our Garifuna brothers and sisters have to be accounted for, so please see the sample by clicking on the picture and learned what to mark when asked about your Race (Some other race).  El Censo de Los EEUU esta por llegar en el año 2010 y queremos que nuestros hermanos y hermanas Garifunas esten preparados para ser contados como Raza Garifuna.  Pincha el logotipo (foto) para poder ver un ejemplo de una boleta.  Garifuna Wagia!

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gulisi Cultural School: Planting seeds to Revitalize the Endangered Garifuna Language

By Jerry A. Enriquez 

 The National Garifuna Council’s recent opening of the Gulisi Community Primary School in Dangriga on September 11, 2007 is a bold and revolutionary accomplishment within Belize’s education system, that cannot be glossed over as a mere footnote of our national development. 

 Unlike other Belizean schools that have predominantly been established by churches to advance their set belief systems, while historically and overtly discouraging traditional cultural values and language, the Gulisi Cultural School seeks a more eclectic approach. Even while embracing the mainstream religious values, the school was established to retrieve, retain, protect and strengthen the cultural values of the Garinagu, especially the moribund Garifuna language that seems, like other indigenous languages, bound to become extinct under our current post colonial-inspired education system. Now, perhaps for the first time in Belize’s history, Garifuna children can speak their language, hear their language and learn their language at school, beginning as early as their first day at school.

 Although recognized in 2001 by UNESCO as a masterpiece of the oral and intangible heritage of humanity, Garifuna language is also among those facing this threat of extinction. The language is spoken mostly by adults who are increasingly no longer teaching it to their children. As a result the number of children learning the language is also rapidly declining. Estimates have shown that as much as 90 percent of the estimated 6,000 languages spoken on earth likely to die or become seriously threatened by extinction within this century.

 How did Garifuna language become endangered?

 Just as western ideology and values have historically bred a culture of arrogant dominance over “the other”, just as this value system tended to promote the ecology of monoculture crops while destroying biodiversity, so too were people processed in our school system towards a form of uniformity. Indigenous groups with their own language and other cultural expressions were shamed into submission and a subjugation of minds towards a sort of monoculture. Several Garifuna elders could recall those times when they were punished or ridiculed at school for even attempting to speak their language. Generally, no one beyond your cultural group cared about your language or cultural background and this was also generally reflected through the entire school system. One was forced to undermine one’s own identity or be viewed as “backward” and made to perish through limited access to opportunities in the mainstream of “development”. Convert to the dominant culture or perish, seems the hallmark of development. 

 It is no wonder that the global pattern exists in which those minority groups most rooted in their traditional culture tend to remain the poorest in their broader mainstream society. All institutions of society – church, school, the family, government, media -- contributed towards this process such that the dynamics of a “developed” people were defined as those furthest from their own roots and traditions and closest to the imitation of the masters of the dominant culture. The result has been that parents, especially mothers (as a major transmitter of language to their children), no longer speak their own language to their children. Over years, if one was not stubbornly grounded and eclectic to embrace both worlds, he or she and their descendants became forever disconnected. This trend has become a rapidly increasing reality within the Belizean Garinagu and Maya communities. In interviews about his internationally popular music release, Andy Palacio recalled his awakening experience that came from his realization that Garifuna language was already virtually extinct in Garifuna communities in Nicaragua. 

 Fortunately, Garifuna music, arts and dance that were made internationally popular by various artists have raised national and international awareness about the culture. The use of Garifuna in the Roman Catholic and Anglican religious services also motivates interests. Yet, in real terms, there continues to be a consistent exponential decline in the use of Garifuna language through each new generation. Even in families headed by two Garifuna parents, it is increasingly becoming evident that none of the children understand or speak a word of Garifuna. 

 That process shaped me too.

 I must admit that, like many other Garifuna who successfully made it through the education system, I too was a result of a socialization process that has contributed to this decline. I grew up with both my Garifuna parents. However, my father, like his father, served as a teacher in Roman Catholic schools all over the colony of British Honduras, somehow was instilled with the idea that his children stood a better chance to advance in life, if we took command of English from as early as possible. Perceived as an advantage towards upward social mobility in a subtly racist then colonial society, English was the language of choice among a number of Garifuna families headed by teachers or other professionals. This was the practice throughout the 1900s when Garifuna men were employed as teachers to pioneer the church school system in the rural parts of British Honduras. Over time, this practice became one of several factors that have resulted in much decline in the use of Garifuna language. As a result, like my father’s and grandfather’s generation of Garifuna teachers and those before, all my siblings spoke only English at home almost as if it were our first language. Today virtually none of my late grandfather’s grandchildren, or great-grandchildren or their descendants speaks Garifuna. Perhaps they never will. Invariably, this seems the pattern among Garifuna families, except that today, Creole has become the first language of choice, even in homes with two Garifuna parents.

 My limited knowledge of Garifuna language came largely from the insistence of my two grandmothers during my childhood years and later, in adulthood, was nurtured by a Garifuna woman I dated who spoke only Garifuna and Spanish. I am still learning my own language and re-capturing important traditional values that were lost through this system.

 (Ironically, even while some Garifuna teachers and professionals did not encourage the use of their language among their children, they were arguably, the only group in Belize that were adept at speaking the languages of the communities they served. For example, apart from speaking Garifuna and English, both my grandfather and father, like other Garifuna teachers, were also very fluent in Spanish, Creole, Mopan Maya and Kekchi Maya as a result of their teaching experiences in several communities.) 

 All is not yet lost for Garifuna language – Gulisi shows hope

 Despite the system of socialization and education that has discouraged the use of indigenous languages, all is not lost. The opening of the Gulisi Community Primary School is a challenge to reverse centuries of onslaught on Garifuna language and culture.  The experiences that will be derived from this unique school brings some hope towards encouraging national policies and strategies to bring about better appreciation and use of indigenous languages within the broader school system, especially in communities that are predominant of these cultures.

 And this could not have come at a more opportune period of our history, coinciding with the UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples that was passed on September 13th, 2007 after about 22 years of negotiations. This declaration was supported by 144 votes and voted against by USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand -- perhaps influenced by their historically brutal racist treatment of their indigenous peoples. 

 Among the 46 Articles of this UN declaration is the solemn proclamation that indigenous peoples, “have the right to establish and control their educational systems and institutions providing education in their own languages, in a manner appropriate to their cultural methods of teaching and learning.”  It also declares that “Indigenous peoples have the right to revitalize, use, develop and transmit to future generations their histories, languages, oral traditions, philosophies, writing systems and literatures, and to designate and retain their own names for communities, places and persons.” “States shall, in conjunction with indigenous peoples, take effective measures in order for indigenous individuals, particularly children, including those who live outside their communities, to have access, when possible, to an education in their own culture and provided in their own language.”

 There is still hope to re-kindle vital aspects of all of our Belizean cultures. Those who have lost touch can re-learn valuable lessons. Those who are well rooted must maintain the patience and passion to reach out to those who aren’t. 

 When I watch the gleaming innocent eyes of the Infant 1 children entering the Gulisi Community Primary School, it is with the realization that a new day has dawned for them, a renaissance in their traditional language and traditional in a new school culture that will truly respect and nurture their “right to the dignity and diversity of their cultures, traditions, histories and aspirations.” Even as the children are being prepared for the broader world, through the learning of school subjects, they will be imbued with a rooted sense of their history, language, and culture that over the years had been subtly pushed towards its extinction. It is not only endangered animals or forests that need resources and urgent intervention to enhance their well-being. People too. Ubafu houn sun gurigia. Power to all the people.


LEARNING THE BASIC RULES IN THE WRITING AND READING OF GARIFUNA

The following information was compiled from several published textbooks that have attempted one way or another to set the standards in the writing and reading of the Garifuna language.  One of those books is by Don Justo and it is entitled "A Study in the Reading and the Writing of the Garifuna Spanish and English" copirighted in 1983 in the State of California.  Don Justo makes a very important reference to the fact that the letters J, Q, V X and Z are omitted from the Garifuna alphabet.

In this textbook, Don Justo also makes it clear that there are 2 words that he has seen spelled differently which make use of the letter J as in the case of  GUNJAI (a spirited dance performed mostly by the elderly) which must be clearly and rightly spelled GUNCHAI as in the original garifuna sense of the word.  Also, JAMANI (it refers to the Germans) which should be spelled YAMANI perhaps because of the lack of familiarity with the use of the letter J as pronounced in English, Don Justo adds.

He emphasizes the ability of the Garifuna to adopt words from other languages like English and Spanish: Lion (English) =  Leòn (Spanish) = Liyun (Garifuna)   Ray = Rayo = Rayu

Sentences - Oraciones:

1. I have a sister and a brother-in-law - Tengo una cuñada y un cuñado - Gamulelua ni yan gaguyaun

2. We love our parents - Amamos a nuestros padres - Hisientiyun wagübeirigu waun

3. She needs rice, beans, milk and coffee - Ella necesita arroz, frijol, leche y cafe - Megeitu rii, aifi, miligui tuma gafe

4. He takes care of his sister and his brother - El cuida a su hermana y a su hermano - Ligia auniguiru barun litu luma lamulen

HATI LIDAN IRUMU - MONTHS OF THE YEAR - MESES DEL AÑO (Roy Cayetano)

traditional:               present:                    english:               Español:

ASINAUN                ENERU                    = JANUARY         ENERO 

MARIRUBANU      BIAN HATI            = FEBRUARY       FEBRERO

BAGAMU                ÜRÜWA HATI      = MARCH             MARZO

ISURA                      GADÜRÜ HATI    = APRIL                 ABRIL

SIRÜGÜ                    SENGÜ HATI       = MAY                   MAYO

WAREIDI                SISI HATI             = JUNE                   JUNIO

EBEDIMU                SEDÜ HATI          = JULY                   JULIO

MUBE                       WIDÜ HATI         = AUGUST           AGOSTO

LUBUNIGIRI           NEFU HATI          = SEPTEMBER     SEPTIEMBRE

URAU                      DIISI HATI           = OCTOBER          OCTUBRE

YABURA                UNSU HATI         = NOVEMBER       NOVIEMBRE

LUGUMU IRUMU DUUSU HATI      = DECEMBER       DICIEMBRE                 

To be continued...posted on Jan. 10, 2007 (please e-mail us your corrections)

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New Orleans Louisiana Estados Unidos de Norteamerica Dic. 6, 2006

HONDURAS UN PAIS DE EMIGRANTES;  Atraves de la continua publicacion, por medio del diario( LA TRIBUNA), con fecha del 10-05-06 hasta 10-26 del mismo ano, del anteproyecto ley ''PROTECCION DE LOS EMIGRANTES HONDURENOS Y SUS FAMILIAS'' presentado al congreso nacional de Honduras en el mes de septiembre/ mes de la independencia centroamericana, como tambien mes denominado de grandes conquistas internacionales por la defensa y promocion de los derechos civiles, protagonizado por el Rev, MARTIN LUTHER KING JR, y sus seguidores respectivamente, Pues es sumamente imprescindible e humanitaria    la iniciativa del excelente profecional ''JORGE RAMON ALCERRO HERNANDEZ'', en la presentacion de esta ley antes mencionada, tomando en concideraciones que dicha ley, no es de interes particular de la ANDI, tampoco de MIGUEL FACUSE BARHUN, punto peor de otra empresa privada, sino que es interes del PUEBLO EN GENERAL DE RICOS Y POBRES,Cabe destacar que este anteproyecto de ley, ha sido elaborado con mucha dedicacion,conocimiento de causa, estudio, reflexion y suficiente conocimiento de datos estadisticos investigados e publicados, por lo tanto concidero y recomiendo a todas las poblaciones sobre la imperiosa necesidad de la reafirmacion y apoyo ha esta digna causa, por todas estas importanticimas valores y razones de orden imprescrible, humanitarias, sociales, juridicas internacionales,espirituales y demas politicas que lo hace urgente( BOMBA DE TIEMPO), para que el Estado de Honduras y demas representantes diplomaticos universales podamos todos adaptar una verdadera politica de ciencia social, solidaridad, fraterna coherente e comprensiva sobre todos estos aspectos reivindicativos e dignos, que el Hermano 'JORGE RAMON ALCERRO HERNANDEZ, ha dejado plasmado seguramente con lagrimas interninable, por el veneficio del anteproyecto ley.Pues la serteza, voluntad politica y social descanza en  la honorable junta directiva del poder legislativo, de tal manera en la conciencia Patriotica, Morazanista,Walumugista,Lempirista,Vallista, Satuyista,Baraudista, Malcon Xista,Luther Kingsista, Mandelista, Rosa Parkista, Alfonsista,Lombardista, Casildista,Avilista, Solisista, Aurelista, Dayanarista,Rubensista, Bernardista,Ofranista,Odequista y demas lideres y     diputados comprometidos en los diferentes partidos politicos, mas el sentimiento y    compromiso de las organizaciones fraternales, opds, Mamugah,Amhon,Iglecias y demas   fuerzas vivas,Pues indudablemente que todos estamos obligados a precionar la tuerca       politica hacia la misma direccion para que podamos darle la prioridad para el estudio,socializacion y dictamen en comicion integra, y posteriormente para su discucion y aprobacion en el ceno de la camara legislativa, FELICIDADES HERMANO' JORGE RAMON ALCERRO HERNANDEZ''  POR TU INVALUABLE E INNOVADOR VISION Y SUENO FUTURISTA, POR LA DEFENSA DE LOS EMIGRANTES HONDURENOS,QUE DE ALGUNA MANERA NOS HEMOS RECONVERTIDO EN LA ESPERANZA Y MOTOR DE DEL PAIS,     DE TODOS MODOS'' WE DESIRE TO FIGTH FOR OUR IDENTITY, LAND, DIGNITY AND CULTURE, WISH WERE HANDED DOWN TU US BY OUR ANCESTORS                                                     Att;Bernardo Guerrero(YellowHihihiGarifuna),Miembro del comite de vigilancia de la Empresa Garinagu de Transformacion y Servicio Iseri Lidawamari

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GARIFUNA VILLAGE ON WHEELS
By Cheryl Noralez & Rony Figueroa

Many people find that working together is very difficult especially when it comes to working with garinagu.  We heard a well-respected friend of ours say that garinagu do not like to work together and that they have been divided from the beginning of time.  Even during the time that they got exiled from Yurumein, garinagu always chose to be divided.  The elite and scholarly stayed away from the common people, the mundane, and the ones that liked drinking.  In contrast though, what we were able to witness during the garifuna Float was the opposite of what we had heard.  garinagu came together as an organized community to show their pride and rich culture by building the garifuna Float.  Some called it the floating exotic island.  During the parade, the float was decorated with people dancing to the rhythm and the beat of the drums, chanting their ancestral songs away.

Everywhere the garifuna village on wheels rolled, people applauded and shouted the names of their countries as they saw their respective flags hanging from the float.  We heard people shout Viva Honduras! Viva Guatemala! Arriba Belice! Vamos Nicaragua!  There was an ensemble of dancers walking along the float and they were dressed in traditional garifuna clothes. These young dancers were the life of the float.  They were the ones that got the party started as people from the audience jumped in front of them to punta and wind.  It was like a big carnival in the streets of Los Angeles.

PLANNING

The Central American Festivities Committee, also known in Spanish as COFECA, has been organizing the annual Central American independence parade for over 15 years.  GAHFU decided that this year garinagu would be represented in this celebration by entering the parade in the form of a folkloric float.  The idea behind it was to be able to educate the public about who the garifuna people are.  Moreover, the parade was broadcasted by Telefutura channel 10 in Los Angeles.  This would be the proper venue to showcase the garifuna punta dancing, drumming and singing in all its richness.  It was then when Cheryl’s idea came alive, to make a garifuna village on wheels.  Rony visualized my idea and put it on paper in the form of a drawing, better yet, a sketch.

The task of making this float a reality was put in the hands of the very own garifuna people and organizations.  Some of the things that were needed were: renting a 54-footer flat-bed-truck, renting a generator to power the sound system and buying the wood and nails to build the hut.  The structure would have to be strong enough to keep the riders from falling off.

VOLUNTEERS AND DONATIONS

We received small and large donations from people and other organizations who were genuinely interested in the making this float a reality.  We did fundraiser dances and sold food to pay for the parade entrance fee, the purchase of the material to dress all of the float participants in traditional garifuna clothes and to pay the driver of the truck.  

The community of Puerto Barrios gave us their unconditional love by supporting all of our events.  Byron Lucero donated wood to build the frame of the hut and the railing around the flat-bed.

THE FLOAT

It started as a dream that one day garinagu would come together and have their own float decorated and choreographed by themselves.  It took garinagu from all nations to conceive this magnificent float.  There were Belizean, Honduran, Guatemalan, American and even Dr. Gill from St. Vincent working on this project.  It was the day that everybody united as one for a common cause.

Los Angeles garifuna organizations were invited to join in the fundraiser, the decorating and the building of the garifuna village float.  The help came from Static Productions, DJ Ervin Arzu, Anthropologist Michelle Goldweisser as well as Ms. Martha Martinez’s Garifuna Cultural Group and their gayusas.  The youth dancers led by Garifuna Cultural Group were also present.  Many individuals gave us their support and help unconditionally; Ellis Noralez, Tomas Gotay and Funati took charge of the building of the structure.  Then the rest of the Gayusas came to decorate with flags and garifuna artifacts.

There were also the drummers who volunteered their time and talent choreographed by the undying dedication of Mr. Mingo Alvarez.   The drummers were Chukupen Paulino, Chilo Castillo and Don Julio.  The gayusas who participated singing their ancestral chants away were led by Ms. Martha Martinez, Berta Loretto, Chana Garcia, Minerva Delgado and Josefina Gregorio.  Tomas Gotay, Joanne Noralez, Georgette Lambey, Marie Centeno, Josie Gregorio, Beulah Francisco and many others danced and chanted on top of the float.  Ellis Noralez played the role of our chief Chatuye swinging a machete leading the procession. 

In conclusion, the next time you hear people say that garifuna people can’t work together, tell them that they are wrong because you have seen the beauty that can be accomplished when we come together. The hard work that it took to make the garifuna float a reality was all worth it at the end. 



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             Get to know more about the Bay Islands in Roatan (Rubadan)


          BAY ISLANDS, ROATAN - ISLAS DE LA BAHIA, ROATAN

TRUJILLO, COLON This is the second Garifuna settlement after Roatan.

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                        Get to know more about La Buga - Livingston


                                              LIVINGSTON - LA BUGA

PUERTO BARRIOS, IZABAL The capital city of the department of Izabal

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                Get to know Grigadan - Dangriga


    DANGRIGA,  BELIZE - FORMERLY KNOWN AS STANN CREEK TOWN

PUNTA GORDA, TOLEDO (BELIZE)

HOPKINS VILLAGE, BELIZE

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READING GARIFUNA

By Clifford J. Palacio

For many, the reading of Garifuna is a difficult task. In this presentation I will endeavor to    make the reading of Garifuna easy and enjoyable. Before you begin this seemingly impossible and laborious task you must first be willing and ready to change your perception of the reading of Garifuna. You must accept the challenge that you need to consider yourself a true beginner. Imagine the time when you first started to learn to read English. Your kindergarten teacher might have used either the "look and say" method or the "phonetic" method.

In the learning of phonics you were taught the sound of vowels (a, e, i, o, u) and the consonants. You were taught, among other things, the short sounds of the vowels.   Perhaps, you were taught that if you took the letter "a" and added the letter "t" to it you got "at" using the short sound of the vowel "a". You were then asked to repeat aloud the sounds. The other vowel letters were treated in a similar way and gradually you learnt to read by stringing the words together in reading groups of words in sentences. The reading of Garifuna for you now is similar to the process you experienced in the early stages of your learning which is "a vital mental process by means of which knowledge, shills, and attitudes   are acquired, retained and utilized resulting in the progressive adaptation of conduct and behavior".

While reading Garifuna, you must be patient to read first slowly every syllable of each word before you repeat, reading the same word and gradually go faster. As you go through this process, remember to make a conscientious and deliberate effort to identify some of the following key characteristics and attributes of the Garifuna language:

1. The short vowel sounds of a, e, i, o and u. There are no long vowel sounds in Garifuna. Remember to repeat as many times necessary, sounding aloud, the vowel sounds until you    feel comfortable. Measure your own progress.

ari           teeth            ereba           cassava       iruni         sadness

aban        one             echuni         custom         iri            name

arani       medicine      erei             strength       iawaii      picture

amu        another       ebegi            cost             iduhei      relative

nofuti     sufficient       gan            news

sonuti     sound          uraga           history

onwere   right hand   uremu          song

nwebu   enormous    ugudi           foot

2.  Mono-Syllabic Words; These words are spelled with only two
letters as the following:

le                 this (m)                   to                 this (f)

fe                 information              ro               fish eggs

fu                to blow, restless       ka              who, what, which

ye                untruthful                lu               long (time)

ya                here                       che            don't do it

da                mother                    ha             these

hu                hoe                        ua            no

3.  The sound of the "Ü" - (u with umlaut). Compare the sound of the
regular "u" with that of the "u". Repeat, sounding out the words
until you are satisfied that you truly understand the difference. Be
sure to make a mental note of your finding.

BURÜRÜ                yard

ÜRÜWA                three

ÜDURAÜ               fish

URAÜ                   skin

4.  The nasal sound. This sound is produced by making breadth go
through the nose as the sound of "n". In Garifuna, when an 'V is
preceded by a vowel, nasalization occurs.

a.  fein                   bread

b.  tin-we-we          a fruit

c.   seinsu             money

d.  winandu            beef

5.  The guttural sound. Loosely, this sound is produced in the throat
causing a vibration in the throat area.

a.  bun                   to you

b.  sun                   all

c.  ban                   socks

d.  unhun              pigeon

6.  The sound of the "n". "N" is used in place of "y" and is
pronounced as the same sound used in the Spanish language.

a.  le-re-mu-ha-na he is singing

b.  nei                    there

c.  noun                 as usual

d.  anura                 to sit

7.  Vowel digraph. Two vowel letters stand side by side and are
sounded together.

a.   dein                  thimble

b.  arigai                ear

b.  wein                  twenty

c.  duari                 be careful

8. Vowel tri-graph. This occurs when three vowel letters follow one another in sequence       and are sounded together.

a.  furieigi              prayer

b.  sugÜguaÜ       competition

c.  idemuai           help

d.  Kauaigien?      Why?

For maximum results, you need to make a positive and conscientious effort to master the         use of the vowel sounds. Perhaps, the most challenging task you will encounter is to learn     and understand fully the value of the frequently used "Ü" and **fi".

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POEM - POEM - POEM - POEM - SUBMITTED BY JARREEN RAMOS NEW YORK -


Garifuna is a struggle that survives challenges!

Garifuna is the beauty that shine the parks when the fellas come and
show off the Wanaragua dance.

Garifuna is a grandmother, grandfather and the fanfarones who sit on the
the porch and talk about how they met when they were 17 and the first
time they met their fathers in law

Garifuna is the sweet taste of the coconut soup with the mashed
plantains on the lazy sunny sunday afternoon by the beach.

Garifuna is the young child who is just born and have given hope to the
struggle.

Garifuna is Pali, whom like the tree during the storm, he still stands
tall.

Garifuna is James, Aziatic, Jimmy, NURU and Supa G. They voices of
tomorrow and presence of today.

Garifuna is on a resume: Because once there, chances you are moving up.

Garifuna is garinet: world wide, feel me?

Garifuna is you, numada. Chilling and laughing because you know how good
it feels when you read and know what you are and what you can become.

Garifuna is the Turtle shell band whom stamped the term " Uwala
Busiganu."

Garifuna is freedom: During the revolutionary war between the US
Colonies and the British empire, our ancestors put their arcenal
together in the name of freedom and sacrifice the leadership of Joseph
Chatoyer.

Garifuna is possitive, regardless of what the haters have campaigned on.

Garifuna is Teodoro Palacio Flores: Check...3 Gold medals and a stadium
name after him.

Garifuna is Milton Nunez, Saul Martinez and David Suazo: Because without
them, Honduras would have never reached the peak to the World cup in
2001.

Garifuna is Milton Palacio: The first Garifuna in the N.B.A.

Garifuna is Augusto Mejia: The first Garifuna politician in Guatemala to
sit in the National Congress in Guatemala.
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Posted 05-01-06

GARIFUNA PRE-ELEMENTARY MATH - MATEMATICA GARIFUNA PREPRIMARIA:



"Ladamuridagun loguru"
Furumietu sileisi

1. Aban   Yusubei hererun baguburigu lu barengunei katei buri le bisaminarugubei lidan
lachawaragun numeru.

a. Yusuba dimurei lauti numeru le megeiwati buidu keiburi; weiriti, libirigua, lunurou,
bururauti, dabubereti, buinti, malati, inu, unabu, yarafati, diseti, ani yusubeime.

b. Gibeti luma louguati.

2. BiamaYusubei dimurei lauti numeru, le yusuwati lidan legeyedagun ubou.

a. Ouseraba dimurei weiriti luwei luma linurou luwei.

b. Adugaba ondaruni.

c. Nurugudabei daradu lun gamalanen o mamalanen lugubu aban ondaruni.

d. Nurugudabei daradu aban-aban.

e. Arufudabei numeru lidan waburudagule dan 10 disi.

f.  Lirabei ani aburuhabeime lugubu numeru lumagie nikata dan 10 disi.

g.  Adugaban libiawagu Iidangie londaru aban adamurinei.
h. Falabei nubiti.


Libiama sileisi

1. Abahudabei numeru lidan Garifuna.

2.  Liridawaguniwa liri weyu, hati le tidanbei luweyuri hati irumurugu.

3. Uwaraguagudabei liri weyu le tidanbei luweyuri hati irumurugu.

4. Yusubei btsubudi luagu katei le lanina binasinun.

a. Arufudahabei numeru lumagie ni kata dan wein.

b. Lirabei ani burubeime numeru dari wein.
 
Luruwan sileisi

1. Furendeibou luweyuri hati irumurugu luma ladurawaguniwa dan.

a. Iridaguabei liriburi weyu luma hati tidangie luweyuri hati irumurugu.

b.  Ewegehabei ladurawaguniwa hati lidan luweyuri aban dimasu, luma lidan weyu.

2. Adugaba libiawagu numeru le megeiwati.

a. Adugaba libfawagu lau lafarenguagudo lau buri numeru le labuguaruguti

De me gumularu aturiahati Garifuna garudia to latatiraha furendein giaran halime.

1.  Layusuru dimurei lidan numeru, lidan meme wereru o wanasiun lun giaran bei lan
wachurunei le lidan bei wasamina.

2.    Louseru dimurei lauti numeru, lidan aban geyegou.

3.    Lun wayusurunei wasubudi lidan numeru, lidan giebuga le higirubei waguburigu woun.

4.   Lun wasubudiragun wuniwagua lidan laburudun luma lalihun numeru.

5.   Lun giara guawama wamagua lun wadugunei londaru luma lafarenraguagudu numeru.

6.   Lun wasubudirunou luweyuri hati, luma ladurawagun dan.

7.   Lun layusurun amisurahanei uwaraguati, lau katei le lilana fulasu.

8.   Lun layusurun subudi luaguti egesihani lau numeru lidan ibagari sagu weyu.

9.   Lun layusurun dimurei amisurahowati lidan ibagari sagu weyu

10. Lun lasubudiru lihuru sensu le wayusuragule fulasurugu o loubawagu wadimalu.

Beresegu le luti lounigiruniwa buidu tidan kara aban tidan gie luban furendei lu giaran la houserunei hibagei hinarinu irahunu, hama ti enerinu irahunu

Ligadurun sileisi

1. (Aban)-       Yusuba amisuragulei le lilanan fulasu.

                        a. Adugaba amisuragulei le yusuwati oudurugu.

2.  (Biama)-    Yusuba saminou lauti egesihanei lidan numeru, labadunagua bibagari,

                            sagu weyu. 

                        a. Ladugun egesihanei lidan saminou le merenguti.

                        b. Adugaba egesihanei lidan liderebugun dan.

3.  (Uruwa)     Subudila lebegi luma layusuru lisensu wageira bu.

                        a. Yusubei lisensu bageira lau aban chorunei.

                        b. Ouseraba lirahunu sensu keiburi senguti luma disiti gawanu lau sun
                            daransuti.

                        c.  Ouseraba sensu le gadiskalenti luma fiaduruti.

4. (Gaduru)- Adugaba amisurahanei lau dimurei.

                       a. Daribei amunegueinarugu luwuyeri laini.

                       b. Arufudabou, uruwaguatu, gararaguatu tuma gaduruguatu.


Wadagimanu:

1. Nayanuhali le narihibei lidan furumieti ubanau.

2. Niridahali liri katei le narihibei lidan ubanau le.

3.  Narufudali lau nuhabu katei buri le weiribei,
     libirigua o luñurourou.

4. Narufudaru uruwagubei iawau to unabubou ani
    arenganeime tuweinamu.

5. Nadibuha tidan yogumere ka la iawau weinamubou,
    tibiriguabou tuma, tirahunubou.

6. Nafiuha, lirahunu dubu ligibuogu katei le weinamubei
   ani abuginein la.



Wadagimanu

1. Nayanuhali luwagu le narihibei tidan iawau to weiribou.

2. Niridali tiri iawau to ñuburibou, to gabiriguabou tuma to weinamubou.

3. Sungubei wagia waduga aban ili, ame wouchu wararamu ligibugie o
lanagagie le migifebei.

4. Naluaha fiyu katei le amuñegueinarugu luweinamu, ame narufudunei
hun nanigu .

5. Naputiha tidan yogumere katei buri le migifebei, le libiriguabei, luma
le nuburiguarugubei.

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Wadagimanu

narufudali katei la nurouroubei lidangiñe

1. Nadimureha tuwagu iawau to wuribou. 

2. Narufudali lau nuhobu katei la tima nurou timabei luma le weiritimabei.

3. Naluahaban katei le nuburibei, luma le inubei.

4. Naputiha tidan yogumere aban katei iñuti luma aban katei unabuti.

5. Nadugubou iawau to tidan yogumere ani ame nichugunei katei le hisieti nu.

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WADAGIMANU 

1. Ariyoguawamon iawau buri to, ame werengunei halia la menegeguata.

2. Nariñegali katei tima la narihibei tidan iawau to.

3. Niridahali liri katei buri le narihibei tidan iawau to.

4. Nariñagubei liri katei buri le dudubei luma le mabeibei tidan nani luban furendein.

5. Naputihabei katei le mabeibei tidoun yogumere le narihibei tidan iawau to.

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THE TEARS OF MY ANCESTORS  By Cheryl Noralez

The tears of my ancestors are falling upon me,
The wail of their cries, echoes in my ear.

The disillusion of hopelessness burns through my eyes;
Their pain, I feel deep inside my heart.

Help me wipe away their tears with knowledge, awareness
And the love that we have for our Garifuna heritage.

Let us give them hope!
That their spirit may never be forgotten.

Let us be the beacon in which their light will shine.
Extending our hands to each other,
Reaching out to our Garifuna Brothers and Sisters.

Great ancestors weep not no more,
Your Garifuna people will persevere!

The unexplainable link that we have towards each other,
Is one that is strong and cannot be easily broken.

So dry those tears my great ancestors!
Weep not, Weep not, Weep not no more!_______________________________________________________________________




 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 





 

 

 




 






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                                 Unknown Garifuna Population  By Cheryl Noralez

 
It is hard to estimate the entire population of the African, Carib and Arawark offspring’s known as the Garifuna (Karifuna or Black Carib). The Garifuna nation is habitually linked only to the Black Caribs of St. Vincent and Grenadines who were exiled to Central America in 1797; however, the Garifuna populace expands far beyond what has been traditionally written. Many Garinagu unfortunately do not know who they are simply because they ignore their origin or have remained out of touch from their community or village. This phenomenon is common throughout the African Diaspora.

 In the early days, the island natives used to socialize and network with one another.  This particular characteristic of socializing among other island natives is not exclusively practiced by just the decendents of the Garifuna who are still numerous in Central America. This pattern of African, Carib and Arawak intermingling is repeated from South America (Surinam & Guyana, North Brazil) all the way to the present day Central America. This mixture is also visible throughout the Caribbean and North America (Antigua & Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, British Virgin Island, Grenada, Martinique, St. Kitts & Nevis, St. Lucia, Trinidad & Tobago and U.S. Virgin Island). The following countries are excluded because they exclusively claim only Arawak lineage: Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Netherlands Antilles, Cuba, Haiti (Hispaniola) and Puerto Rico (Boriken). It is unknown why these countries only claim to be descendants of the Arawak and not also the Carib. The country of Dominica was also excluded because they solely claim to be descendants of the Caribs.  It is obvious that at some point in time these two indigenous groups coexisted and intermarried throughout the Greater and Lesser Antilles. The Garifuna people are kin to both the Arawak and Carib natives.

 In keeping with traditional Garifuna oral and written history, it is the initial mixture of both the Arawak and Carib lineage along with the infusion of African heredity which contributed to our Garifuna existence. If this indeed is what makes us Garifuna, then we should take into account those people possessing the same exact fusion as ours in estimating the Garifuna population.

 For the purpose of this article, I will refer to this excluded group as the “unknown caribs”.  In my attempt to put it all together, I have asked the following question before but never received a rational answer. Aren’t we all Garifuna?  But the frequent answer that I get is that “unknown caribs” are not considered Garifuna because they were descendants of slaves and Garifuna people are not.  This, I believe, is a weak argument especially because some written accounts of Garifuna history state that, we too, are the actual descendants of escaped slaves. On the other hand, the way our story is told today, contradicts our origin and our oral narration; we are not descendants of escaped slaves.  We are a new breed of people who were created out of the mixture of Arawak, Carib and African who revolted and settled in the Lesser Antilles as their new home.

 Language also seems to play a vital role among those who are not categorized as being true Garifuna. Language is also a dividing factor among the Garifuna in Central America and the United States. Not being able to speak Garifuna has been a debate for years among those who do speak the language.  Often, not being able to speak the language becomes a barrier for those individuals who would like to identify themselves as Garifuna. Garifuna speakers tend to shun those who are not fluent in the language. I particularly maintain my position that we should develop some type of resolution rather than ridiculing those who lack the ability to speak the language.

 Once we begin to focus on our similarities, the picture becomes clear of just how much we have in common. For example, the food we eat and the way we prepare and consume it. The staple food of the Garifuna people is ereba (casave, yucca, cassava). Our name Garifuna literally translated means the cassava eating people. Puerto Ricans are cassava eating people as well.  Many people still prepare the ereba the same way that our ancestors did. The Dominicans have a drink called “Mamajuana” made out of herbs, tree bark and rum that the locals refer to as “liquid viagra”. In the Garifuna community we have a similar concoction that we call “Gifiti” or bitters that we also refer to as “Viagra”.

 Our ancestors and Garinagu today practice worshiping which is also a very common thing in some parts of Brazil and Haiti (Hispaniola). Our collective practices as native people which were handed down from our ancestors, prior to the European conquest, are virtually the same throughout the Americas and the Caribbean. It is unfortunate that Native and African descendants tend to only recount their historical accounts from when the Europeans arrived and omit or forget that our ancestors coexisted in harmony prior to the invasion.

 The story of the Garifuna must continue to be told for the world to know making sure that we include the Arawak and Carib people as part of our existence. Our collective stories are similar when it comes to survival despite the constant battles that we fought against the British and other European invaders. The Garifuna Nation is rather small compared to other races nevertheless our people continue to grow and disseminate especially in North America today.   In conclusion, until we recognized the fact that the Garifuna presence reaches far beyond the borders of Central America, our population will always remain undercounted, underrepresented and struggling to maintain its identity as an endangered species.

Written by: Cheryl Noralez

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Posted on Fri. March 17, 2006

 


                                                       

 
The Rib Bone of a Man

Women are said to have been created from the rib bone of a man
Fact or fiction that does not make a man superior to a woman
Beating their chest like the mighty Tarzan
Wanting to prove that they are still the king of the jungle!

Underestimating and devaluating the power of a woman’s strong mind
Condescending towards the opinion of a woman’s voice
Intimidated by the thought of a woman in power
Men who are men prefer a woman to stand beside and with him.

Men who are boys prefer a woman to stand behind and beneath him
Men take pride in their anatomy that supply the seed of life
Women have the precious gift of a womb to bear the fruit of mankind
The nourishing milk of a woman’s breast sustain the man from birth to death.

That extra rib bone that was given only further enhanced the inner being of us women
Men have been trying for centuries to compensate for that one rib bone that was taken 
This is not a poem to put down my brothers
This is a poem to uplift the spirit and voice of my sisters.

Written by Cheryl L. Noralez

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GAHFU's Department of Language and Cultural Education

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AFRICA'S 'GREATEST EXPLORER' - Courtesy of BBC News 12/13/00

By Joan Baxter in Mali An African emperor who ruled Mali in the 14th century discovered America nearly 200 years before Christopher Columbus, according to a book to be launched this month. Abubakari II ruled what was arguably the richest and largest empire on earth - covering nearly all of West Africa.

Our aim is to bring out hidden parts of history

Khadidjah Dire According to a Malian scholar, Gaoussou Diawara in his book, 'The Saga of Abubakari II...he left with 2000 boats', the emperor gave up all power and gold to pursue knowledge and discovery.

Most Griots are beginning to divulge Abubakari's secrets
The researchers claim that Abubakari's fleet of pirogues, loaded with men and women, livestock, food and drinking water, departed from what is the coast of present-day Gambia.

Mali was a gold kingdom, but most families live in poverty
But the scholars say the best sources of information on Abubakari II are Griots - the original historians in Africa.

Abubakari's ambition was to explore whether the Atlantic Ocean - like the great River Niger that swept through Mali - had another 'bank'.  In 1311, he handed the throne over to his brother, Kankou Moussa, and set off on an expedition into the unknown.  His predecessor and uncle, Soundjata Keita, had already founded the Mali empire and conquered a good stretch of the Sahara Desert and the great forests along the West African coast.

Gold fields

The book also focuses on a research project being carried out in Mali tracing Abubakari's journeys.  "We are not saying that Abubakari II was the first ever to cross the ocean," says Tiemoko Konate, who heads the project

"There is evidence that the Vikings were in America long before him, as well as the Chinese," he said.  They are gathering evidence that in 1312 Abubakari II landed on the coast of Brazil in the place known today as Recife.

"Its other name is Purnanbuco, which we believe is an aberration of the Mande name for the rich gold fields that accounted for much of the wealth of the Mali Empire, Boure Bambouk."

Another researcher, Khadidjah Djire says they have found written accounts of Abubakari's expedition in Egypt, in a book written by Al Omari in the 14th century.  "Our aim is to bring out hidden parts of history", she says.

Black traders

Mr Konate says they are also examining reports by Columbus, himself, who said he found black traders already present in the Americas.  They also cite chemical analyses of the gold tips that Columbus found on spears in the Americas, which show that the gold probably came from West Africa.

Mr Diawara says the paradox of Abubakari II, is that the Griots themselves imposed a seal of silence on the story.

"The Griots found his abdication a shameful act, not worthy of praise," Mr Diawara said.
"For that reason they have refused to sing praise or talk of this great African man."

Mr Diawara says the Griots in West Africa such as Sadio Diabate, are slowly starting to divulge the secrets on Abubakari II.

'Hard-nosed historians'

But the research team says an even bigger challenge is to convince hard-nosed historians elsewhere that oral history can be just as accurate as written records.  Mr Diawara believes Abubakari's saga has an important moral lesson for leaders of small nation states in West Africa, which were once part of the vast Mande-speaking empire.

"Look at what's going on in all the remnants of that empire, in Ivory Coast, Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea.  "Politicians are bathing their countries in blood, setting them on fire just so that they can cling to power," says Mr Diawara.

"They should take an example from Abubakari II. He was a far more powerful man than any of them. And he was willing to give it all up in the name of science and discovery."

"That should be a lesson for everyone in Africa today," concludes Mr Diawara.

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The following poems were written by Cheryl Noralez.

THE TEARS OF MY ANCESTORS

The tears of my ancestors are falling upon me,
The wail of their cries, echoes in my ear.

The disillusion of hopelessness burns through my eyes;
Their pain, I feel deep inside my heart.

Help me wipe away their tears with knowledge, awareness
And the love that we have for our Garifuna heritage.

Let us give them hope!
That their spirit may never be forgotten.

Let us be the beacon in which their light will shine.
Extending our hands to each other,
Reaching out to our Garifuna Brothers and Sisters.

Great ancestors weep not no more,
Your Garifuna people will persevere!

The unexplainable link that we have towards each other,
Is one that is strong and cannot be easily broken.

So dry those tears my great ancestors!
Weep not, Weep not, Weep not no more!

WHEN I DIE

We lay to rest one of our Garifuna sisters.
We lay to rest one of our Garifuna Brothers.
We lead them into the hands of our Lord,
Singing our Garifuna songs.

We lay to rest one of our own,
For when they die,
They are neither American-Belizean,
Honduran nor Guatemalan…
They are only Garifuna.

When I die, bury me in my Gúdú
And tie my Músuwe around my head.
When I die, let the drums beat loud,
so my ancestors will know that I am on my way home.

When I die,
lay my Garifuna flag over my casket
so those who did not know that I was a Garifuna when I was alive,
will know that I am Garifuna when I die.

THE HEARTBEAT OF OUR GAROUN

Our Drum is the pulsating rhythm of the Garifuna heartbeat
Feel the vibration of Our Ancestors from within
Listen to the wail of their forgotten souls

Hear and feel the hypnotizing beat of the Garifuna Drum
Let the Garaoun take you back in time
When we once danced on the shores of Yurumein

Listen carefully!
You will hear the echoes of the children at play
Listen to the whistle of the gentle ocean breeze

Smell the sweet aroma of the tropical fruits
Hear the soft whisper of Our Ancestors singing
See through their eyes the way it once was!

Envision the beauty that once surrounded us in our homeland Yurumein!
Feel the warm embrace of our Ancestor’s arms welcoming us back home!
Jump and rejoice to the heartbeat of our Garaoun!

Let the vibration take control of your body
Listen and feel the beat from the inside out
Let our rhythm revive the spirit of our Ancestors

So they too can dance among us
For so long the silence of their Drum
Has been deafening to their ears.

Beat, beat that thunderous Drum!
Call out to our people to unite us once again
Let us all dance to the rhythm of our Garifuna Beat!





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